Interesting official testimony from survivors of the Titanic (Long)

// November 6th, 2015 // People in Unusual Circumstances

Interesting official testimony from survivors of the Titanic

During the United States Senate Inquiry into the sinking of the “unsinkable” Titanic on April 15, 1912, many survivors provided testimony describing their last moments on the ship. Below is a sampling of those testimonies.

Testimony of Olaus Abelseth

(Testimony taken separately before Senator William Alden Smith, chairman of the subcommittee.)

(The witness was sworn by Senator Smith.)

 

Senator SMITH.

I wish you would tell the reporter when you first knew of this collision, and what you did, and where you were in the ship. I believe you were a steerage passenger?

Mr. ABELSETH.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

In the forward part of the ship?

Mr. ABELSETH.

Yes. I was in compartment G on the ship.

Senator SMITH.

Go ahead and tell us just what happened.

Mr. ABELSETH.

I went to bed about 10 o’clock Sunday night, and I think it was about 15 minutes to 12 when I woke up; and there was another man in the same room – two of us in the same room – and he said to me, “What is that?” I said, “I don’t know, but we had better get up.” So we did get up and put our clothes on, and we two went up on deck in the forward part of the ship.

Then there was quite a lot of ice on the starboard part of the ship. They wanted us to go down again, and I saw one of the officers, and I said to him: “Is there any danger?” He said, “No.” I was not satisfied with that, however, so I went down and told my brother-in-law and my cousin, who were in the same compartment there. They were not in the same room, but they were just a little ways from where I was. I told them about what was happening, and I said they had better get up. Both of them got up and dressed, and we took our overcoats and put them on. We did not take any lifebelts with us. There was no water on the deck at that time.

We walked to the hind part of the ship and got two Norwegian girls up. One was in my charge and one was in charge of the man who was in the same room with me. He was from the same town that I came from. The other one was just 16 years old, and her father told me to take care of her until we got to Minneapolis. The two girls were in a room in the hind part of the ship, in the steerage.

We all went up on deck and stayed there. We walked over to the port side of the ship, and there were five of us standing, looking, and we thought we saw a light.

Senator SMITH.

On what deck were you standing?

Mr. ABELSETH.

Not on the top deck, but on – I do not know what you call it, but it is the hind part, where the sitting room is; and then there is a kind of a little space in between, where they go up on deck. It was up on the boat deck, the place for the steerage passengers on the deck. We were then on the port side there, and we looked out at this light. I said to my brother-in-law: “I can see it plain, now. It must be a light.”

Senator SMITH.

How far away was it?

Mr. ABELSETH.

I could not say, but it did not seem to be so very far. I thought I could see this mast light, the front mast light. That is what I thought I could see.

A little while later there was one of the officers who came and said to be quiet, that there was a ship coming. That is all he said.

He did not say what time, or anything. That is all he said. So I said to them, we had better go and get the lifebelts, as we had not brought them with us. So my cousin and I went down to get the lifebelts for all of us. When we came up again we carried the lifebelts on our arms for a while.

There were a lot of steerage people there that were getting on one of these cranes that they had on deck, that they used to lift things with. They can lift about two and a half tons, I believe. These steerage passengers were crawling along on this, over the railing, and away up to the boat deck. A lot of them were doing that.

Senator SMITH.

They could not get up there in any other way?

Mr. ABELSETH.

This gate was shut.

Senator SMITH.

Was it locked?

Mr. ABELSETH.

I do not know whether it was locked, but it was shut so that they could not go that way.

A while later these girls were standing there, and one of the officers came and hollered for all of the ladies to come up on the boat deck. The gate was opened and these two girls went up.

We stayed a little while longer, and then they said, “Everybody.” I do not know who that was, but I think it was some of the officers that said it. I could not say that, but it was somebody that said “everybody.” We went up. We went over to the port side of the ship, and there were just one or two boats on the port side that were lost. Anyway, there was one. We were standing there looking at them lowering this boat. We could see them, some of the crew helping take the ladies in their arms and throwing them into the lifeboats. We saw them lower this boat, and there were no more boats on the port side.

So we walked over to the starboard side of the ship, and just as we were standing there, one of the officers came up and he said just as he walked by, “Are there any sailors here?”

I did not say anything. I have been a fishing man for six years, and, of course, this officer walked right by me and asked: “Are there any sailors here?” I would have gone, but my brother-in-law and my cousin said, in the Norwegian language, as we were speaking Norwegian: “Let us stay here together.” I do not know, but I think the officer wanted some help to get some of these collapsible boats out. All he said was: “Are there any sailors here?” I did not say anything, but I have been used to the ocean for a long time. I commenced to work on the ocean when I was 10 years old with my dad fishing. I kept that up until I came to this country.

Then we stayed there, and we were just standing still there. We did not talk very much. Just a little ways from us I saw there was an old couple standing there on the deck, and I heard this man say to the lady, “Go into the lifeboat and get saved.” He put his hand on her shoulder and I think he said: “Please get into the lifeboat and get saved.” She replied: “No; let me stay with you.” I could not say who it was, but I saw that he was an old man. I did not pay much attention to him, because I did not know him.

I was standing there, and I asked my brother-in-law if he could swim and he said no. I asked my cousin if he could swim and he said no. So we could see the water coming up, the bow of the ship was going down, and there was a kind of an explosion. We could hear the popping and cracking, and the deck raised up and got so steep that the people could not stand on their feet on the deck. So they fell down and slid on the deck into the water right on the ship. Then we hung onto a rope in one of the davits. We were pretty far back at the top deck.

My brother-in-law said to me, “We had better jump off or the suction will take us down.” I said, “No. We won’t jump yet. We ain’t got much show anyhow, so we might as well stay as long as we can.” So he stated again, “We must jump off.,” But I said, “No; not yet.” So, then, it was only about 5 feet down to the water when we jumped off. It was not much of a jump. Before that we could see the people were jumping over. There was water coming onto the deck, and they were jumping over, then, out in the water.

My brother-in-law took my hand just as we jumped off; and my cousin jumped at the same time. When we came into the water, I think it was from the suction – or anyway we went under, and I swallowed some water. I got a rope tangled around me, and I let loose of my brother-in-law’s hand to get away from the rope. I thought then, “I am a goner.” That is what I thought when I got tangled up in this rope. But I came on top again, and I was trying to swim, and there was a man – lots of them were floating around – and he got me on the neck like that (illustrating) and pressed me under, trying to get on top of me. I said to him, “Let go.” Of course, he did not pay any attention to that, but I got away from him. Then there was another man, and he hung on to me for a while, but he let go. Then I swam; I could not say, but it must have been about 15 or 20 minutes. It could not have been over that. Then I saw something dark ahead of me. I did not know what it was, but I swam toward that, and it was one of those collapsible boats.

When we jumped off of the ship, we had life preservers on. There was no suction from the ship at all. I was lying still, and I thought “I will try to see if I can float on the lifebelt without help from swimming,” and I floated easily on the lifebelt.

When I got on this raft or collapsible boat, they did not try to push me off and they did not do anything for me to get on. All they said when I got on there was, “Don’t capsize the boat.” So I hung onto the raft for a little while before I got on.

Some of them were trying to get up on their feet. They were sitting down or lying down on the raft. Some of them fell into the water again. Some of them were frozen; and there were two dead, that they threw overboard.

I got on this raft or collapsible boat and raised up, and then I was continually moving my arms and swinging them around to keep warm. There was one lady [Rhoda Abbott] aboard this raft, and she got saved. I do not know her name. I saw her on board the Carpathia, but I forgot to ask her name. There were also two Swedes, and a first class passenger – I believe that is what he said – and he had just his underwear on. I asked him if he was married, and he said he had a wife and a child. There was also a fireman named Thompson on the same raft. He had burned one of his hands. Also there was a young boy, with a name that sounded like Volunteer. He was at St. Vincent’s Hospital afterwards. Thompson was there, too.

The next morning we could see some of the lifeboats. One of the boats had a sail up, and he came pretty close, and then we said, “One, two, three”; we said that quite often. We did not talk very much, except that we would say, “One, two, three,” and scream together for help.

Senator SMITH.

Was this collapsible boat that you were in filling with water?

Mr. ABELSETH.

There was water on the top.

Senator SMITH.

Were you on the top of the overturned collapsible boat?

Mr. ABELSETH.

No. The boat was not capsized. We were standing on the deck. In this little boat the canvas was not raised up. We tried to raise the canvas up but we could not get it up. We stood all night in about 12 or 14 inches of water on this thing and our feet were in the water all the time. I could not say exactly how long we were there, but I know it was more than four hours on this raft.

This same boat I was telling about –

Senator SMITH.

The sailboat?

Mr. ABELSETH.

Yes; when the Carpathia came she was picked up. There were several boats there then. It was broad daylight and you could see the Carpathia. Then this boat sailed down to us and took us aboard, and took us in to the Carpathia. I helped row in to the Carpathia.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any icebergs on that morning?

Mr. ABELSETH.

We saw three big ones. They were quite a ways off.

Senator SMITH.

I want to direct your attention again to the steerage. Do you think the passengers in the steerage and in the bow of the boat had an opportunity to get out and up on the decks, or were they held back?

Mr. ABELSETH.

Yes, I think they had an opportunity to get up.

Senator SMITH.

There were no gates or doors locked, or anything that kept them down?

Mr. ABELSETH.

No, sir; not that I could see.

Senator SMITH.

You said that a number of them climbed up one of these cranes?

Mr. ABELSETH.

That was on the top, on the deck; after they got on the deck. That was in order to get up on this boat deck.

Senator SMITH.

Onto the top deck?

Mr. ABELSETH.

Onto the top deck; yes. But down where we were, in the rooms, I do not think there was anybody that held anybody back.

Senator SMITH.

You were not under any restraint? You were permitted to go aboard the boats the same as other passengers?

Mr. ABELSETH.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you think the steerage passengers in your part of the ship all got out?

Mr. ABELSETH.

I could not say that for sure; but I think the most of them got out.

Senator SMITH.

Did that part of the ship fill rapidly with water?

Mr. ABELSETH.

Oh, yes; I think that filled up; yes. There was a friend of mine told me that he went back for something he wanted, and then there was so much water there that he could not get to his room.

Senator SMITH.

Were the three relatives of yours from Norway lost?

Mr. ABELSETH.

Yes; they were lost.

Senator SMITH.

You never saw them after you parted from them at the time you spoke of?

Mr. ABELSETH.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know how many people there were in that lifeboat that you were in?

Mr. ABELSETH.

I could not say for sure; but there must have been 10 or 12. They got saved off this raft. There was one man from New Jersey that I came in company with from London. I do not know what his name was. I tried to keep this man alive; but I could not make it. It was just at the break of day, and he was lying down, and he seemed to be kind of unconscious; he was not really dead, and I took him by the shoulder and raised him up, so that he was sitting up on this deck.

Senator SMITH.

He was sitting on a seat?

Mr. ABELSETH.

He was just sitting down right on the deck. I said to him, “We can see a ship now. Brace up.” And I took one of his hands and raised it up like that (illustrating), and I took him by the shoulder and shook him, and he said, “Who are you?” He said, “Let me be. Who are you?” I held him up like that for a while, but I got tired and cold, and I took a little piece of a small board, a lot of which were floating around there, and laid it under his head on the edge of the boat to keep his head from the water; but it was not more than about half an hour or so when he died.

Senator SMITH.

That is all. We are very much obliged to you.

(Witness Excused.)

 

Correspondence of C. C. Adams

POSTAL TELEGRAPH-CABLE CO.,

EXECUTIVE OFFICES; 253 BROADWAY.

New York, May 21, 1912.

Hon. WILLIAM ALDEN SMITH,

United States Senator, Washington, D. C.

DEAR SIR: In compliance with your request in regard to the wireless message from the Carpathia, announcing the sinking of the Titanic, dated April 15, but not actually delivered in New York until April 17, I write to state:

The Postal Telegraph-Cable Co. received this message at its main operating room in New York City on April 7, at 8.58 a. m., by direct wire from Montreal, and delivered it from its branch office at the Produce Exchange to the White Star office within 30 minutes from the time the message reached our lines. The telegraph department of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which sent us the message from Montreal at 8.58 a. m., on April 17, informs us that they received the message from the wireless company at Halifax, Nova Scotia, at 8.20 a. m., on the same morning. April 17.

I would add that my company has no knowledge of any person withholding any reports of the sinking of the Titanic.

Very respectfully,

C. C. ADAMS,

Vice President, Postal Telegraph-Cable Co.

 

Testimony of Dickinson H. Bishop

(The witness was sworn by Senator Smith.)

Senator SMITH.

What is your age?

Mr. BISHOP.

Twenty-five.

Senator SMITH.

Mr. Bishop, can you add anything to the statement Mrs. Bishop has made?

Mr. BISHOP.

I do not think I can.

Senator SMITH.

Is there any information beyond that which she has given which will throw any light or contribute to our investigation?

Mr. BISHOP.

There is one thing, in regard to the watertight compartments on E deck.

Senator SMITH.

You may state it.

Mr. BISHOP.

It has to do with the mechanical closing of them. Some way or other, it had a brass plate in the deck, and from what I know – I do not know from my own observation, but only from what I have heard from some other people I knew on the boat – immediately after the accident they saw the members of the crew trying to do something to these holes in the deck with a key such as they use in the shut-offs to the water system in cities, and placing the key down there, they failed to turn the one of that side, and they immediately went to the other side and could not close that. They said, “There is no use; we will try the other side.” What it was or how serious it was I do not know.

Senator SMITH.

Did you notice any other defects of any kind?

Mr. BISHOP.

Not any. Leaving the boat as soon as we did, we had very little opportunity to observe what happened on the deck after the first lifeboat left.

Senator SMITH.

This plate to which you have referred was in the floor of E deck?

Mr. BISHOP.

In one of the passageways.

Senator SMITH.

In the floor?

Mr. BISHOP.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

On E deck?

Mr. BISHOP.

As I understand it, yes, sir; or else on the wall.

Senator SMITH.

You say the crew could not turn this bolt or –

Mr. BISHOP.

Whatever it was; the shut-off.

Senator SMITH.

And what did they do when they found it could not be turned?

Mr. BISHOP.

One of the members of the crew who was engaged in trying to turn this, said to the other one, “It is no use; we will try the other side.”

Senator SMITH.

What member of the crew was that, if you know?

Mr. BISHOP.

I could not answer that correctly. I do not know. As I said, my information came through other people, passengers.

Senator SMITH.

From what you saw of that, do you know whether this had to do in any way with the efficiency of the watertight compartments?

Mr. BISHOP.

Only in that the plates were marked –

Senator SMITH.(interposing)

“W”?

Mr. BISHOP.

With “W.T.” or “W. T. C.” The letters “W. T.” I remember particularly.

Senator SMITH.

How long were the members of the crew trying to turn this plate or bolt?

Mr. BISHOP.

I do not know.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know the name of the person who saw the attempt made?

Mr. BISHOP.

Mr. Hardy. [George A. Harder]

Senator SMITH.

What are his initials?

Mr. BISHOP.

George A.

Senator SMITH.

And what is his address? Is it the Grosvenor; 27 Fifth Avenue, New York?

Mr. BISHOP.

That is correct.

Senator SMITH.

Who told you to get into the lifeboat?

Mr. BISHOP.

One of the officers in charge of the lowering; which one, I could not tell. There was some confusion there at the time, and I did not pay much attention. There was an officer stationed at the side of the lifeboat, and as my wife got in I followed immediately, and he helped me into the boat, or rather indicated, and I fell into the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Did Mrs. Astor get in the same lifeboat?

Mr. BISHOP.

No; she did not. I did not see Mrs. Astor except on the A deck earlier in the evening.

Senator SMITH.

What time?

Mr. BISHOP.

Just before the order to put on the lifebelts.

Senator SMITH.

After the collision?

Mr. BISHOP.

After the collision.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Col. Astor about that time?

Mr. BISHOP.

I did not.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know in which boat Mrs. Astor left the Titanic?

Mr. BISHOP.

I do not; no.

Senator SMITH.

Did you know anything about the people in your lifeboat, except yourselves? Did you know any of them except your wife?

Mr. BISHOP.

Yes; the French aviator – they called him “Marshall” [Marachel] – was in our boat. I could not pronounce his name.

Senator SMITH.

Anybody else?

Mr. BISHOP.

Mr. Greenfield, with his mother, living in New York.

Senator SMITH.

Did anyone attempt to get into your lifeboat, either while it was being lowered or after it was in the water?

Mr. BISHOP.

There was a little confusion on the deck at that time. No one rushed the boats, at all.

Senator SMITH.

How long after the impact was it before the order was given to lower the lifeboats, or clear the lifeboats?

Mr. BISHOP.

I did not hear the order given.

Senator SMITH.

Did you hear anyone give any warning, or did you hear any alarm given to waken the passengers after the impact?

Mr. BISHOP.

I did not hear any alarm. The alarm we had was from another passenger, a friend of ours on the ship.

Senator SMITH.

What was his name?

Mr. BISHOP.

Mr. Stewart. He was lost.

Senator SMITH.

Do you remember his first name?

Mr. BISHOP.

His initials were “A.A.” Mr. A.A. Stewart, of New York.

Senator SMITH.

And he did not survive?

Mr. BISHOP.

He did not.

Senator SMITH.

Did anyone attempt to get out of your lifeboat after it reached the water?

Mr. BISHOP.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Do you agree with your wife that there were 28 people in your lifeboat?

Mr. BISHOP.

That was what the count was, after we took it.

Senator SMITH.

Did you count them?

Mr. BISHOP.

Each passenger was supposed to have counted one number, starting in the bow and going back.

Senator SMITH.

That is, they started with one to count, and it ran up to 28?

Mr. BISHOP.

Yes, sir; but there were some I know who were missed, and there is a possibility of there having been more people in that boat at the time. It was very difficult to take the number correctly on account of the scattered position of the passengers.

Senator SMITH.

Were there any children in that boat?

Mr. BISHOP.

There was a woman with her baby transferred from another lifeboat, I think.

Senator SMITH.

That is, after you reached the water?

Mr. BISHOP.

After the Titanic had sunk.

Senator SMITH.

After the sinking?

Mr. BISHOP.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Can you tell how long it was after you left the side of the Titanic before she sank?

Mr. BISHOP.

I can not tell, exactly. I imagine the time the boat was lowered was about a quarter to 1, and the only information I have as to the time of the sinking comes through the reports, that it was probably in the neighborhood of 20 minutes after 2.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know, of your own knowledge, that lifeboat No. 7, in which Mrs. Bishop and yourself left the Titanic, was the first boat lowered on the starboard side?

Mr. BISHOP.

It was. We had been on the boat deck in the neighborhood of 10 minutes, watching them prepare the boats for lowering. At that time there were very few people up on deck, and from the testimony I have heard, and from what I have heard, it seems there were a good many people who did not get onto the boat deck until after they had started lowering the boats.

Senator SMITH.

Did you hear any order given by anyone for the men to stand back?

Mr. BISHOP.

I heard no such order.

Senator SMITH.

“Women first,” or “Women and children first”?

Mr. BISHOP.

No.

Senator SMITH.

At the time the first lifeboat was lowered, are you willing to say that that order had not been made?

Mr. BISHOP.

Absolutely.

Senator SMITH.

Of the 13 passengers in your lifeboat, did you say you knew none except your wife?

Mr. BISHOP.

I knew a good many of them –

Senator SMITH. (interposing)

Your wife and this Frenchman?

Mr. BISHOP.

I knew other men in there, but I can not recall their names. I would like to revise that statement I just made, in a way, about the order, “Women first.” I can say positively there was no such order given on the starboard side, near where our boat was lowered. What happened on the port side I knew nothing of, at all.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know what officer took charge of loading and lowering the boats on the starboard side?

Mr. BISHOP.

Only from what I have heard of the testimony.

Senator SMITH.

Was it Mr. Murdoch or Mr. Lightoller?

Mr. BISHOP.

I could not be sure who it was, from my own observation; only from the testimony here.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see the captain there superintending that part of the work, at any time?

Mr. BISHOP.

I did not see the captain after the accident.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see him before the accident?

Mr. BISHOP.

No.

Senator SMITH.

I think that is all, Mr. Bishop. We are very much obliged for your kindness in waiting so long.

(Witness excused.)

Testimony of Helen Bishop

(The witness was sworn by the chairman.)

Senator SMITH.

What is your full name?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Mrs. Helen W. Bishop.

Senator SMITH.

And what is your address?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Dowagiac, Mich.

Senator SMITH.

You were on board the Titanic on this ill-fated voyage?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Did anything in particular occur to attract your attention to the ship or any special feature of the ship while you were en route from Southampton to the place of this accident?

Mrs. BISHOP.

We thought of nothing at all except the luxury of the ship; how wonderful it was.

Senator SMITH.

I wish you would tell the committee what you did after learning of this accident.

Mrs. BISHOP.

My husband awakened me at about a quarter of 12 and told me that the boat had struck something. We both dressed and went up on the deck, looked around, and could find nothing. We noticed the intense cold; in fact, we had noticed that about 11 o’clock that night. It was uncomfortably cold in the lounge. We looked all over the deck; walked up and down a couple of times, and one of the stewards met us and laughed at us. He said, “You go back downstairs. There is nothing to be afraid of. We have only struck a little piece of ice and passed it.” So we returned to our stateroom and retired. About 15 minutes later we were awakened by a man who had a stateroom near us. We were on B deck, No. 47. He told us to come upstairs. So we dressed again thoroughly and looked over all our belongings in our room and went upstairs. After being there about 5 or 10 minutes one of the men we were with ran up and spoke to the captain, who was just then coming down the stairs.

Senator SMITH.

Who was the man?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Mr. Astor.

Senator SMITH.

Col. Astor?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Yes. The captain told him something in an undertone. He came back and told six of us, who were standing with his wife, that we had better put on our lifebelts. I had gotten down two flights of stairs to tell my husband, who had returned to the stateroom for a moment, before I heard the captain announce that the lifebelts should be put on. That was about three or four minutes later that the captain announced the lifebelts should be put on. We came back upstairs and found very few people up.

Senator SMITH.

When you say upstairs, which deck do you mean?

Mrs. BISHOP.

We were on B deck, and we came back up to A deck. There was very little confusion; only the older women were a little frightened. They were up, partially dressed. So I sent a number of them back and saw that they were thoroughly dressed before they came up again. Then we went up onto the boat deck on the starboard side. We looked around, and there were so very few people up there that my husband and I went to the port side to see if there was anyone there. There were only two people, a young French bride and groom, on that side of the boat, and they followed us immediately to the starboard side. By that time an old man had come upstairs and found Mr. and Mrs. Harder, of New York. He brought us all together and told us to be sure and stay together; that he would be back in a moment. We never saw him again. About five minutes later the boats were lowered, and we were pushed in. At the time our lifeboat was lowered I had no idea that it was time to get off.

Senator SMITH.

Tell me which lifeboat you refer to?

Mrs. BISHOP.

The first lifeboat that was taken off the Titanic on the starboard side. I think it was No. 7. Officer Lowe told us that.

Senator SMITH.

All right. Proceed.

Mrs. BISHOP.

We had no idea that it was time to get off, but the officer took my arm and told me to be very quiet and get in immediately. They put the families in the first two boats. My husband was pushed in with me, and we were lowered away with 28 people in the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Was that a large lifeboat?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Yes; it was a wooden lifeboat.

Senator SMITH.

And there were 28 people in it?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Yes. We counted off after we reached the water.

Senator SMITH.

How many women were there?

Mrs. BISHOP.

There were only about 12 women.

Senator SMITH.

And the rest were –

Mrs. BISHOP. (interposing).

Were men.

Senator SMITH.

Yes; but I want to divide the rest into two classes, the crew and the passengers.

Mrs. BISHOP.

There were three of the crew. The rest of them were passengers. We had no officer in our boat.

Senator SMITH.

Three of the crew?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Three of the crew.

Senator SMITH.

And 13 passengers?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Thirteen passengers; yes. Among those there were several unmarried men in our boat, I noticed, and three or four foreigners in our boat. After we had been out in the water about 15 minutes – the Titanic had not yet sunk – five boats were gathered together, and five people were put into our boat from another one, making 33 people in our boat.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know from what boat these persons were transferred to your boat?

Mrs. BISHOP.

No; I can not say. The man in charge was an officer with a mustache. I have never seen him since.

Senator SMITH.

Did the boat from which these people were transferred seem to have more people than yours?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Yes, sir; they had 39, I believe, or 37, or something like that.

Senator SMITH.

Do you remember the number of the boat?

Mrs. BISHOP.

No; I do not.

Senator SMITH.

Go ahead.

Mrs. BISHOP.

We had been rowing for some time when the other people were transferred into our boat. Then we rowed still farther away, as the women were nervous about the suction. We waited out in the water perhaps three-quarters of an hour after we had rowed this distance when we saw the Titanic sink. For some time after that we were separated from all of the boats except one; that tied to us and stayed with us. We found we had no compass, no light, and I do not know about the crackers or water; but we had no compass and no light. We were out there until just before daylight, I think it was, when we saw the lights of the Carpathia and rowed as hard as we could and arrived at the Carpathia 5 or 10 minutes after 5 o’clock in the morning.

Senator SMITH.

I suppose your experience was the same as that of the others as to the presence of ice and your proximity to icebergs?

Mrs. BISHOP.

Yes; we saw a number of icebergs.

Senator SMITH.

Is there anything else you care to say which will throw any light upon our inquiry as to the causes of this catastrophe or the conduct of the officers and crew of the Titanic?

Mrs. BISHOP.

The conduct of the crew, as far as I could see, was absolutely beyond criticism. It was perfect. The men in our boat were wonderful. One man lost his brother. When the Titanic was going down I remember he just put his hand over his face; and immediately after she sank he did the best he could to keep the women feeling cheerful all the rest of the time. We all thought a great deal of that man.

Senator SMITH.

What was his name?

Mrs. BISHOP.

I do not know. He was on the lookout immediately after the boat had struck.

Senator SMITH.

Was it Fleet?

Mrs. BISHOP.

No; it was not.

Senator SMITH.

Was it Lee?

Mrs. BISHOP.

I do not think I ever heard his name. I know the name of one man in the boat was Jack Edmunds; I think it was.

Senator SMITH.

That was this lookout?

Mrs. BISHOP.

No; the man at the other end. They were great friends, I remember.

Senator SMITH.

Is there anything else you care to say?

Mrs. BISHOP.

No; that is all.

Senator SMITH.

Very well; you may be excused.

(Witness excused.)

 

Testimony of Joseph G. Boxhall

(The witness was sworn by the chairman.)

Senator SMITH.

How old are you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Twenty-eight years old.

Senator SMITH.

What experience have you had in marine employment?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Thirteen years experience at sea.

Senator SMITH.

Of what has your experience consisted?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The first four years as an apprentice and the remainder of the time as an officer.

Senator SMITH.

On what ships?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I served in William Thomas’s in Liverpool, and was then an officer on the Wilson Line of Hull; and after that on the White Star Line.

Senator SMITH.

How long have you been with the White Star Line?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Five years next November.

Senator SMITH.

In what capacity have you served?

Mr. BOXHALL.

As junior officer.

Senator SMITH.

All of the time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

All of the time while on the White star Line.

Senator SMITH.

Were you especially educated in marine service before you entered the employ of the companies you have named?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes. I had 12 months training in a navigation school.

Senator SMITH.

Where?

Mr. BOXHALL.

In Hull, England.

Senator SMITH.

What did that training consist of?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Navigation and nautical astronomy.

Senator SMITH.

Please state for the information of the committee what positions you have filled on the White Star Line. Please state that again.

Mr. BOXHALL.

As junior officer, ranking fifth and sixth officer, and third officer; and then fourth officer on the last ship.

Senator SMITH.

Tell the committee, so that our records may be complete, the duties performed in each of these different employments.

Mr. BOXHALL.

To generally assist the senior officer of the watch in all cases.

Senator SMITH.

When was this duty assigned to you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When the Titanic left Belfast Lough. His duty is assigned to a man when he is assigned to his ship, and he grows up with it. He learns the different duties he has to perform in whatever rank is on board ship.

Senator SMITH.

Did you join the ship at Belfast Lough?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; at Belfast.

Senator SMITH.

Were you with her when the training tests were made?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Can you tell the committee of what those tests consisted?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Why?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Because I do not know what those tests were for. There were the builder’s men on board, and I was just there to keep lookout and do anything I was told to do.

Senator SMITH.

Were you on board during the maneuvers of this ship in Belfast Lough?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

On what deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the bridge deck.

Senator SMITH.

On the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When on duty; yes.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know how much time was spent in those maneuvers, turning and in a straight course, the day these tests were made?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I can tell you, approximately.

Senator SMITH.

Do so.

Mr. BOXHALL.

We left Belfast about noon, and we steamed –

Senator SMITH.

On what day?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I have forgotten the date.

Senator SMITH.

The 4th of April or the 5th or 6th of April?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know, sir. I would tell you if I knew.

Senator SMITH.

Or the day of the week?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It was on a Tuesday.

Senator SMITH.

Go ahead.

Mr. BOXHALL.

And we steamed until about between 7 and 8 o’clock at night. We finally left Belfast about 8 o’clock at night..

Senator SMITH.

Where were you headed for?

Mr. BOXHALL.

For Southampton.

Senator SMITH.

What time did you reach Southampton?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Thursday about midnight.

Senator SMITH.

What was the condition of the weather on your trip from Belfast to Southampton?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The weather was fine until about 2 o’clock in the morning.

Senator SMITH.

Of what day?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Thursday; I should say Wednesday morning, until about 2 o’clock. I want to correct that.

Senator SMITH.

What happened then; that is, how did you distinguish between the conditions of the weather?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When I came on duty at 4 o’clock in the morning it was foggy.

Senator SMITH.

Was there any sea?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; there was practically no sea, and little wind.

Senator SMITH.

And when you say that the weather was not good you mean that it was foggy?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

All the way?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; it cleared up about 6 o’clock in the morning.

Senator SMITH.

When you went on at 4 o’clock it was foggy?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

And the fog lifted about 6 o’clock?

Mr. BOXHALL.

About 6.

Senator SMITH.

And you proceeded to Southampton without any change in the weather?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; without any change in the weather.

Senator SMITH.

And the water, the sea –

Mr. BOXHALL.

Was smooth all the way.

Senator SMITH.

What did you do when you reached Southampton?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I kept my usual watch on board the ship. I really do not remember what watch I did keep until the time of sailing.

Senator SMITH.

You did not leave the ship?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh yes; oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

Where did you go when you left the ship?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Well, I went around the town. I went ashore.

Senator SMITH.

After your watch?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When my watch was over.

Senator SMITH.

And when did you return to the Titanic, with reference to the hour of her departure?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The last time I was ashore I returned the night previous to sailing, about 11 o’clock, I suppose.

Senator SMITH.

Were there others with you at the time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not think so.

Senator SMITH.

Other officers or crew?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

In the performance of your duty while at Southampton did you have any authority over the men; and if so, over whom?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When I was on duty on board ship whilst at Southampton during the daytime there was always a senior officer along with me; so that any questions that were to be asked could be answered by him, or if anything was to be found out I would always refer to him, to the senior officer. At nighttime the two junior officers were in charge of the ship, with men on watch with them.

Senator SMITH.

You say there was always a senior officer on duty?

Mr. BOXHALL.

And a junior officer, in port.

Senator SMITH.

But you did not give any orders –

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Because there were senior officers on board all the time up to the time of sailing? Who were those officers?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Sometimes the first, sometimes the chief, and sometimes the second.

Senator SMITH.

Who was the first officer?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Lightoller was the first officer until the day before the ship sailed.

Senator SMITH.

Who became first officer then?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Murdoch.

Senator SMITH.

Had he been first officer before?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; he had been chief officer.

Senator SMITH.

But, he superseded Mr. Lightoller the night before sailing?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

At the time of departure Mr. Murdoch was first officer?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is so.

Senator SMITH.

What were his duties?

Mr. BOXHALL.

His duties were, as officer of the watch, to keep a lookout for the ship and see that the junior officers did whatever he required to carry out the captain’s orders.

Senator SMITH.

Was it a part of his duty to have drills and inspections?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No. The captain arranged all the drills and inspections.

Senator SMITH.

Were there any drills or inspections to your knowledge, from the time the ship landed at Southampton until her departure?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; there were inspections and drills the morning of sailing.

Senator SMITH.

Of what did they consist?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The crew were mustered and when the names were called the boats were lowered in the presence of the Board of Trade surveyors.

Senator SMITH.

When you say “boats,” you refer to lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The lifeboats were lowered in the presence of the Board of Trade surveyors.

Senator SMITH.

This occurred the day you sailed?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; within an hour or a couple of hours of the ship’s sailing.

Senator SMITH.

Can you recall just who was present at that inspection?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The captain, all the officers, the marine superintendent, and the Board of Trade surveyors, and the Board of Trade doctor.

Senator SMITH.

Was there anyone else present?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not that I know of – not an official.

Senator SMITH.

Were any other officers or directors of the company present besides the ones you have named?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say; I do not remember.

Senator SMITH.

Was Mr. Ismay present?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not remember.

Senator SMITH.

Were all the lifeboats lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Why not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Because they do not require all the boats to be lowered so far as I know.

Senator SMITH.

The regulations do not require it? How many boats were lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Two boats were lowered, I believe.

Senator SMITH.

One on each side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; they could not lower them on each side. The ship was laid alongside of the quay.

Senator SMITH.

So they were lowered on one side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Which side; the starboard or the port?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the starboard side.

Senator SMITH.

Can you give the numbers of those lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I can not.

Senator SMITH.

In lowering these lifeboats, did the gear work satisfactorily?

Mr. BOXHALL.

As far as I know. I was not there when they were lowered.

Senator SMITH.

You were not there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, I was in another part of the ship.

Senator SMITH.

And you did not yourself see them lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw them in the water, but I was not actually on the spot when they were lowered.

Senator SMITH.

In lowering the lifeboats, can you tell us just what was done.

Mr. BOXHALL.

First the boat had to be cleared. After the boats are cleared the chocks are knocked down, or dropped down by patent levers, and the boat is hanging free. Then the davits are screwed out and the boat is suspended over the ship’s side all ready for lowering away.

Senator SMITH.

Assuming that these lifeboats are on the boat deck, how far could they be swung off the side before they reached their proper position for lowering?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Far enough to clear the ship’s side, right away down, and allow the boat to touch the water.

Senator SMITH.

The boat deck or sun deck is narrower than the A deck or B deck; is it not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; oh, no.

Senator SMITH.

No narrower?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No narrower. I never noticed it to be narrower.

Senator SMITH.

The same width?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; it all seems to me to be the same width.

Senator SMITH.

But these lifeboats are swung out –

Mr. BOXHALL.

Absolutely clear of the ship’s side.

Senator SMITH.

Absolutely clear of the ship’s side – how far?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say how far.

Senator SMITH.

Before they are swung out, are they supposed to be occupied?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

In case of trouble?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; oh, no.

Senator SMITH.

After they are swung out are they supposed to be loaded from the boat deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is a matter of opinion.

Senator SMITH.

If possible and other things being equal, is that the usual course?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I think it is.

Senator SMITH.

In other words, they are not suspended, then run to the decks below and there filled?

Mr. BOXHALL.

We always lower the boat to the level of the rail or the level of the deck, so the people can step in.

Senator SMITH.

Yes; but to the level of the deck, where it is swung out?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Where it is swung out.

Senator SMITH.

So that the upper deck or boat deck is really the loading deck for the lifeboats under ordinary circumstances?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Did you say whether the lifeboats that you saw lowered were lowered promptly and without any interference?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not see them lowered. I saw them when they were in the water.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see them when they were brought back to the deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I afterwards saw them on the voyage. I was not standing there when they were raised.

Senator SMITH.

You did not see them when they were raised to the deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And you did not see them lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I did not see them lowered.

Senator SMITH.

Who was officer of the watch that day?

Mr. BOXHALL.

All officers were on duty.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Mr. Murdoch there at this time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; and Mr. Wilde, the chief officer.

Senator SMITH.

Were there any lifeboats on the Titanic that were not securely fastened in position to be lowered in the ordinary method of attaching that equipment?

Mr. BOXHALL.

All the boats on the Titanic seemed to me to be in a very good position to be lowered.

Senator SMITH.

How many were there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There were 14 lifeboats, 2 sea boats, and 4 collapsible boats.

Senator SMITH.

The lifeboats were in position?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did they appear to be new?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They were new.

Senator SMITH.

Did you notice whether the name Titanic was upon every boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; on every boat. I will not swear to the collapsible boats.

Senator SMITH.

What are the three types of boat that you have just referred to?

Mr. BOXHALL.

First of all, the lifeboats; then the two sea boats –

Senator SMITH.

One moment. Take the lifeboats. Were they in good condition?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Perfectly good.

Senator SMITH.

How many people under ordinary circumstances, would a lifeboat of the size carried on the Titanic carry in such weather as you experienced?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They were supposed to carry 65 persons.

Senator SMITH.

Why do you say they were supposed to carry 65?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The Board of Trade testify to that.

Senator SMITH.

Is that a part of the certificate of the British Board of Trade?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I suppose that is a part of the regulations. The cubical capacity is on the boats.

Senator SMITH.

How many seats are there in a lifeboat of that character?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I am sure I could not say. I never have counted them.

Senator SMITH.

How many oars are there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I really forget how many oars there were, but there are always two extra ones; there are always two extra oars in the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Can you not think how many there were?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I can not think; because I can not remember how many thole pins there were.

Senator SMITH.

Where were the oars, generally? Under the seats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the top of the seats.

Senator SMITH.

On top of the seats; and you say there were always two extra oars?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Always two extra oars in the boats.

Senator SMITH.

But the compliment you do not know? You can not say what that was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I really can not.

Senator SMITH.

What else is required in those lifeboats, under the regulations of the British Board of Trade?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Boat hooks, water, water breakers, bread tanks, dippers for the water breakers, balers for the boats, mast and sail, compass. I think that is all.

Senator SMITH.

Lights?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes; lights and a can of oil. A lamp and a can of oil.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether these articles required under the regulations of the British Board of Trade were in each of these lifeboats as required?

Mr. BOXHALL.

All the gear was in the boats when we left Belfast; I know that. All the gear was in the boats, because I went around –

Senator SMITH.

Provisions and water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Everything that the Board of Trade requires was in the boats in Belfast.

Senator SMITH.

In Belfast?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether these provisions were in the boats when the Titanic left Southampton?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say. The provisions were, I know, because the provisions are built in with the boat. They are in a tank that is built in the boat.

Senator SMITH.

You are speaking now of your own knowledge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Were you ever in one of these lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Prior to the collision?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not in the water in one; I was not in the water with the boats.

Senator SMITH.

Where were you in the boats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

In Belfast, going through them to see that all the equipment was complete.

Senator SMITH.

You made an inspection?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

And you desire the committee to understand that all of the requirements with reference to the equipment of lifeboats were in these boats when the Titanic left Belfast?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I do not know about when she left Belfast, but it was two or three days before we left that I went through these boats and saw all the equipment complete.

Senator SMITH.

Mr. Boxhall, you described a few moments ago the weather from Belfast to Southampton. Did the weather continue pleasant and the sea unruffled during the voyage from Southampton to the place of this catastrophe?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

In such weather how many people would a lifeboat such as you have described carry safely?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That I would not like to say.

Senator SMITH.

You would not like to say because you do not know?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; a lot depends on the people who get in the boats.

Senator SMITH.

And their condition of mind?

Mr. BOXHALL.

And their condition of mind.

Senator SMITH.

Assuming that they were in great peril and submissive to the directions of those in charge of the boats, how many would one of those lifeboats safely carry?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I should think that providing they did as they were told, they would carry the 65, the complement.

Senator SMITH.

Sixty-five comfortably?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; the complement, I said, of 65.

Senator SMITH.

What about the collapsible boats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I know very little of the collapsible boats. I do not know what they are supposed to hold.

Senator SMITH.

You have seen them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I have seen them; yes.

Senator SMITH.

I wish you would describe, that we may have the record complete, what they are made of; how they are constructed.

Mr. BOXHALL.

The lower part of the boat is wood, and these boats when they are loaded do not seem to me to have very much freeboard except for the canvas which, is pulled up before these boats are lowered.

Senator SMITH.

Is this framework fitted into the canvas, or the canvas to the framework?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; it is the bottom of the boat, and it is rather a shallow boat with a canvas to it which pulls up and forms a kind of protection around the people sitting in the boat.

Senator SMITH.

From what point in the boat’s construction does this canvas appear; from the extreme upper part?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I think it is from the extreme upper part, from what I remember of them. I never have been in one.

Senator SMITH.

But the canvas is not intended to float the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, no; oh, no.

Senator SMITH.

How does it differ from the lifeboat in its security and strength?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not quite understand what you mean?

Senator SMITH.

Do you regard the collapsible boat as safe, well constructed, and suitable as the ordinary lifeboat for the purposes for which they are intended?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not think it would stand so much knocking about as a lifeboat. I do not know what they would behave like in a seaway.

Senator SMITH.

Do you think that they are as well suited to resist the sea?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I should not think so.

Senator SMITH.

Then, according to your judgment, they do not exactly answer the same purpose and requirement as the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I can not say from experience, but I do not think that they would stand the water or the knocking about as a lifeboat would in a seaway.

Senator SMITH.

Are they as easily lowered and kept in position?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not think so. I prefer the lifeboats.

Senator SMITH.

Are they as accessible to people in peril on shipboard as the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It depends upon in what position they are kept.

Senator SMITH.

Where are they kept?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The ones on the Titanic – there was one of them exactly underneath the sea boats davits on either side, on the same level on the boat deck as the lifeboats.

Senator SMITH.

And as securely fastened to the davits?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; she was not securely fastened to the davits. She was not fastened to the davits at all. After the sea boatswere lowered, then would come the collapsible boats.

Senator SMITH.

Where were they? Were they lying about on the deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They were on the deck.

Senator SMITH.

Unattached?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Unattached – unattached to the davits.

Senator SMITH.

How many of these boats were there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Four.

Senator SMITH.

You described another type of boat. What is that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The sea boat or emergency boat.

Senator SMITH.

What kind of a boat is that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is the same as a lifeboat, only smaller and lighter built. It is always kept swung out.

Senator SMITH.

Is it built in the same general manner?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just so.

Senator SMITH.

And of the same material as the lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Of the same material, but smaller.

Senator SMITH.

Smaller?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Smaller.

Senator SMITH.

How much smaller?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say how much smaller. I do not know the size.

Senator SMITH.

Give us your best judgment about it.

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is a boat that is built to be swung out all the time, the emergency boat, so that it can be lowered quickly at a moments notice in case anyone falls over the side.

Senator SMITH.

Is it a boat between the size of an ordinary row boat and a lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is considerably larger than an ordinary rowboat.

Senator SMITH.

Yes; I understand that.

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is a good, seaworthy boat.

Senator SMITH.

How many people will one of those boats hold?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I should say about between 25 and 30; probably 30 at the most.

Senator SMITH.

Are these boats equipped in the same manner as the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; just the same.

Senator SMITH.

And all under the regulations of the British Board of Trade?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

As to inspection and equipment?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Mr. Boxhall, these were all the lifeboats and these were the three types on the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

When she sailed?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just so.

Senator SMITH.

How many people will the collapsible boat carry?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say.

Senator SMITH.

About how many?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know; I would not say; I would not like to form an opinion.

Senator SMITH.

Why is it called collapsible? Can it fold up?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The upper structure of the boat is collapsible.

Senator SMITH.

But the lower part is –

Mr. BOXHALL.

The lower part is the bottom of the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Can you not tell us about how many people those boats will hold?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They seemed to be pretty well packed, those that came alongside of the Carpathia. I did not count the people, but there seemed to be quite a lot of people. I should think they would hold more than one of the emergency boats or about the same number.

Senator SMITH.

Which one of these three type of boats were you in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The emergency boat.

Senator SMITH.

The emergency boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Officer Murdoch, Officer Lightoller, Officer Lowe, and Officer Pitman aboard the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

The day this inspection was made?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Can you state whether they were all present, at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

All the officers were on board the ship doing various duties. I can not say whether they were present when these boats were lowered, but they were all there on board.

Senator SMITH.

So far as you know did each perform his particular duty?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

After leaving Southampton until the catastrophe occurred?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know the habits of these men?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Only what I have seen since I joined the ship. I had never seen them before, except Mr. Lightoller.

Senator SMITH.

And what can you say as to their habits?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Good, steady, reliable men.

Senator SMITH.

What about your own habits?

Mr. BOXHALL.

You had better ask some one else.

Senator SMITH.

You must be cognizant of your own habits.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Pardon me?

Senator SMITH.

You may be too modest to describe them, but you know whether you are a temperate man or not.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Are you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Are you a man of family?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Between Southampton and the place where the Titanic sank were you frequently thrown in contact with your superior officers?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see the captain frequently?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Had you sailed with him before?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; never.

Senator SMITH.

Did your duties necessitate your being near his customary place on the ship?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

As a matter of fact, did you render any service at any time from the bridge? Did you have the right to go on the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

Was it your duty to go there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; it was my duty. When I was on watch I was always on the bridge – on the bridge or inside of the chart room.

Senator SMITH.

How often did you see the captain between Southampton and the place where the ship sank?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Whenever I was on duty I saw him.

Senator SMITH.

And you were on duty how much of the time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Every other four hours after we left Southampton.

Senator SMITH.

Every other four hours after you left Southampton?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Every other four hours.

Senator SMITH.

When did you go on duty Sunday?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Eight p. m.

Senator SMITH.

The day of the accident?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Eight p.m.

Senator SMITH.

Where was your station?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I had no particular station.

Senator SMITH.

On the bridge deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Upon what deck?

Senator SMITH.

Were you on the bridge deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Where was the bridge deck with reference to the boat deck and the A deck and the B deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The bridge deck and the boat deck were all one.

Senator SMITH.

All one?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

The boat deck extended forward?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It was all one deck.

Senator SMITH.

It completed the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You say you went on watch, and that was your post Sunday evening at what hour?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Eight p. m.

Senator SMITH.

Eight p. m.?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And you were required to remain how long?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Until midnight.

Senator SMITH.

Did you spend all of that time that night at your post, on duty?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Were you on the bridge all that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

What proportion of that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Most of the time I was on the bridge.

Senator SMITH.

Most of the time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The greater part of the watch.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether the customary officers were at their posts of duty at the forward end of that boat deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They were, sir.

Senator SMITH.

During your watch?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They were.

Senator SMITH.

Give their names; if you can; and just what their service consisted of.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Lightoller was on the bridge when I went up there along with the sixth officer at 8 o’clock – along with sixth officer Moody.

Senator SMITH.

A little louder, please.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Lightoller was on watch on the bridge when I went on watch at 8 o’clock with sixth officer Moody. Mr. Lightoller was relieved at 10 o’clock by Mr. Murdoch. Mr. Murdoch was on watch until the accident happened.

Senator SMITH.

Who else was forward on that deck or on the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Moody, the sixth officer.

Senator SMITH.

Where was the crow’s nest with reference to the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The crow’s-nest was up the foremast.

Senator SMITH.

How far forward of the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I should say about 120 feet.

Senator SMITH.

How high above the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say what height it was, but the plan will give it to you there.

Senator SMITH.

Can you not say approximately?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I would not like to say.

Senator SMITH.

What is the crow’s-nest?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The crow’s-nest is the lookout box.

Senator SMITH.

How high up on the mast?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say.

Senator SMITH.

Is it a part of the mast?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Who occupied the crow’s-nest during your watch Sunday night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The lookout men.

Senator SMITH.

What is that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The lookout men.

Senator SMITH.

Who were they?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Fleet and Leigh [Lee] were the lookout men at the time. I can not say who were the lookout men before 10 o’clock.

Senator BURTON.

How do you spell that first name?

Mr. BOXHALL.

F-l-e-e-t.

Senator BOURNE.

How do you spell Leigh?

Mr. BOXHALL.

L-e-i-g-h.

Senator SMITH.

Two men were at the crow’s-nest?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see them there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

You could not see them from the bridge.

Senator SMITH.

How do you know they were there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Because they answered the bells from the bridge.

Senator SMITH.

Did they both answer the bells?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

How do you know they both answered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

You could hear them.

Senator SMITH.

How could you distinguish between one answer and the other?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Different voices.

Senator SMITH.

And from that you are satisfied that they were both at their posts?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Who was on the lookout? Who was on the lookout, if anyone, besides these two men?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the bridge?

Senator SMITH.

Yes; on the bridge.

Mr. BOXHALL.

The first officer.

Senator SMITH.

Mr. Murdoch?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; Mr. Murdoch.

Senator SMITH.

Anyone else?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not that I know of.

Senator BURTON.

I understood you were there.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes. I was not on the lookout, though.

Senator BURTON.

You were not on the lookout there, forward?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I was there if I was called.

Senator SMITH.

One moment. I will get along to that. Was the ordinary complement of officers at their posts of duty-

Mr. BOXHALL.

The ordinary complement of officers?

Senator SMITH. (continuing)

At the forward end of that boat., in the crow’s-nest, and on the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

If this lookout had been increased on that night you would have known it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not know. I am not sure whether they were increased or not.

Senator SMITH.

You say there were two men in the crow’s-nest?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There were two men in the crow’s-nest; yes.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know of any increased vigilance?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know. I did not hear of it.

Senator SMITH.

You did not hear of it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not hear of it, but possibly there were extra men on the lookout.

Senator SMITH.

Were these men that were on the lookout the men who performed that service customarily?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

That was their special position?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That was their special position.

Senator SMITH.

Was there anyone up in the eyes, so-called?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see anyone there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not see anyone there.

Senator SMITH.

Where are the eyes?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the forecastle head.

Senator SMITH.

That is out forward?

Mr. BOXHALL.

As far forward as they can possibly get.

Senator SMITH.

Forward of the bridge, and in the bow?

Mr. BOXHALL.

As far as they can possibly get, sir, forward.

Senator SMITH.

You say that you do not know whether there was anyone in the eyes, so-called?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I do not know.

Senator SMITH.

Once more, for the information of my colleague, will you state the location of the eyes on this particular boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is the stemhead, we usually term it. The stemhead is as far forward on board the ship as you can possibly go – the forward extremity of the ship.

Senator SMITH.

It is not in advance of the ship’s bow?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

But as far forward as –

Mr. BOXHALL.

As the taffrail will allow you to go, and the deck extends.

Senator SMITH.

Would the occupants of that point on the boat have been visible to you if they had been there that night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Why?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Because I was not looking for it. I was not looking for them.

Senator SMITH.

Could you have looked ahead and not seen them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

If I had looked ahead I should have seen them.

Senator SMITH.

Do you mean that you did not look ahead?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not notice them. I was in the chart room working out positions, most of the evening – working navigation.

Senator SMITH.

Sunday night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Sunday night.

Senator SMITH.

But you said you were frequently at the bridge that night.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just so.

Senator SMITH.

During the time that you were at the bridge, or on the forward deck, you did not see anyone –

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not look to see them.

Senator SMITH. (continuing)

At the eyes? Well, answer my question. I want you to answer in your own way, of course.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just so.

Senator SMITH.

You did not see anyone there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And you did not look to see?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you know you were in the vicinity of icebergs that night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I did not know we were in the vicinity of icebergs.

Senator SMITH.

Did not the second or first officer apprise you of the fact that they had information that you were in the vicinity of icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I knew we had had information. They did not apprise me that evening of it.

Senator SMITH.

When did they apprise you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

As a matter of fact they did not mention it to me.

Senator SMITH.

Had it never been mentioned to you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes; the captain mentioned it.

Senator SMITH.

The captain mentioned it to you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

When?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know whether it was the day before or two days before he gave me some positions of icebergs, which I put on the chart.

Senator SMITH.

Which you put on the chart?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On his chart.

Senator SMITH.

Did the captain tell you that the Californian had wired the Titanic that they were in the vicinity of icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No. The captain gave me some wireless messages from Southampton, I think, that we had had before we had sailed, and asked me to put these positions on the chart.

Senator SMITH.

Did you know whether a wireless had been received from the Amerika that the Titanic was in the vicinity of icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I could not say.

Senator SMITH.

Do you want us to understand that you had no knowledge of the proximity of this ship to icebergs immediately preceding the –

Mr. BOXHALL.

I had no knowledge.

Senator SMITH.

One moment. (continuing) Immediately preceding the collision, or during the hours of your watch from 8 o’clock until the collision occurred?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not realize the ship was so near the ice field.

Senator SMITH.

You knew you were in the vicinity of the Grand Banks?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I knew we were in the vicinity of the Grand Banks.

Senator SMITH.

What was the weather at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Very fine and clear.

Senator SMITH.

Cold?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; very cold.

Senator SMITH.

Unusually cold?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; not for that time of year.

Senator SMITH.

Did you realize that you were out of the particular influence of the Gulf Stream?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know that the water was taken from the sea frequently that night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I knew the water and the temperature of the air was taken every two hours after the ship left port.

Senator SMITH.

Was the temperature of the water taken at any time to your knowledge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Every two hours after the ship left the port. I do not know what it was.

Senator SMITH.

No; I do not think you understood me. You say that water was taken from the sea and the temperature of the air was taken every two hours after you left port?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

I asked you whether you know the temperature of the water taken from the sea every two hours was tested?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You do know it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

How do you know it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Because the sailor men and the quartermaster took this temperature, and I would see them doing it, sometimes.

Senator SMITH.

Was it reported anywhere?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; it was reported. It was reported to the junior officer.

Senator SMITH.

To the junior officer?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

What was his name?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Moody.

Senator SMITH.

Did he survive the wreck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Was it reported to any other officer?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; but their book was always there for him to see.

Senator SMITH.

Did the log contain any reference to these tests?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

How do you know?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Because it was the junior officer’s duty to see that the log did contain it.

Senator SMITH.

That was his duty?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

And you think that was done because that was his duty?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you yourself take the temperature of the water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

At any time during that voyage?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether that water Sunday night was colder than it was Monday night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, I did not know.

Senator SMITH.

I mean preceding.

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Wednesday night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Do you of your own knowledge know the temperature of that water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not.

Senator SMITH.

Were you in the water-

Mr. BOXHALL. (interrupting)

No, sir.

Senator SMITH. (continuing)

After the collision?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

At no time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

At no time at all.

Senator SMITH.

You do not know of your own knowledge how cold it was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I do not.

Senator SMITH.

But you are willing to say it was a very cold night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes; it was very cold.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know Mr. Bride, the wireless operator of the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether his feet were frozen after the accident occurred and before he reached the Carpathia?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I knew his feet were bad, but I did not know what was the matter with them. I did not know whether they were frozen.

Senator SMITH.

You do not know whether they were frozen or not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say.

Senator SMITH.

Did anyone die aboard the boat you were on between the scene of the sinking – the place of the sinking – of the Titanic and the Carpathia?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know of others dying in these lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know of any dying in the lifeboats.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether Mr. Phillips died in a lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Only what I have heard, that Mr. Phillips died after he was pulled on the – whether he was pulled on or whether he scrambled on the upturned collapsible boat, I could not say. It is only hearsay.

Senator SMITH.

He died?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; he died.

Senator SMITH.

He was the wireless operator who was the chief of Mr. Bride?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

But so far as you know of your own knowledge you are unable to say what the temperature test of this water in the vicinity of the Grand Banks, where this accident occurred, would show?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I am unable to say what it was.

Senator SMITH.

Were there any additional officers or members of the crew stationed in the bows or on the deck Sunday night after you went on watch?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know about any additional members.

Senator SMITH.

The assignments were the permanent assignments; and so far as you know, that is all?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just the usual staff, I knew they would be; but whether there were any additional men there I could not say.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see the captain frequently Sunday night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw him frequently during the watch, sir.

Senator SMITH.

During the watch?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

From 8 o’clock on?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Up to the time of the accident.

Senator SMITH.

Up to the time the Titanic sank?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

How frequently?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On and off, most of the watch.

Senator SMITH.

Where was he when you saw him at these times?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Sometimes out on the outer bridge. I would go out and report. I was working observations out, if you understand, most of that watch working out different calculations and reporting to him; and that is how it was I came in contact with him so much.

Senator SMITH.

Where was he at the times when you saw him?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Sometimes in his chart room and sometimes on the bridge, and sometimes he would come to the wheelhouse, inside of the wheelhouse.

Senator SMITH.

How do you know he would go to the wheelhouse?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I would see him pass through.

Senator SMITH.

You would see him passing through?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Would you see him frequently in the wheelhouse?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Frequently, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Was the captain on deck or on the bridge or in the wheelhouse when you assumed your watch at 8 o’clock?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say where he was. I do not remember seeing him at 8 o’clock.

Senator SMITH.

How soon after you took your watch did you see him?

Mr. BOXHALL.

As near as I can tell, I saw him about 9 o’clock.

Senator SMITH.

About 9 o’clock?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

For the first time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes. I did not say for the first time.

Senator SMITH.

As nearly as you can recollect?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; but a particular incident recalls to me that I did see him about 9 o’clock.

Senator SMITH.

When you say you saw him about 9 o’clock, do you mean just before 9 or just after 9?

Mr. BOXHALL.

You are trying to drive me down to the minute, and I can not state.

Senator SMITH.

I just want to get it as accurately as you can give it. Would you think it was before or after?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say.

Senator SMITH.

About 9 o’clock?

Mr. BOXHALL.

About 9 o’clock, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Was anyone with him when you saw him at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is another thing that is hard to say. I do not remember whether I saw him on the bridge or in the wheelhouse when I reported some positions that I had worked out.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Mr. Ismay?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

With the captain?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

On the bridge, in the wheelhouse, or on the deck that night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

After you took your watch?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; not until after the accident.

Senator SMITH.

Not until after the accident?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you talk with the captain Sunday night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

How frequently?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say how frequently.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know what time he dined that night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Or with whom he dined?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Or where he dined?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

But you do know that about 9 o’clock you saw him on the deck, on the bridge, and in the wheelhouse at various times. Would you say all of the time, in one of those three places after that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not know that the captain was anywhere away from the bridge the whole watch. I mean to say from the bridge taking the whole bridge together; all the chart rooms, and the open bridge. They are all practically on one square, and I do not think the captain was away from that altogether.

Senator SMITH.

When did you last see the captain?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When he told me to go away in the boat.

Senator SMITH.

How long was that after the collision?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know what time I left the ship. I have been trying to find the time or trying to calculate, but I can not think what time it was.

Senator SMITH.

Where were you when the collision took place?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was just approaching the bridge.

Senator SMITH.

On the port or the starboard side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Starboard side.

Senator SMITH.

Did the collision occur on the port or the starboard side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the starboard side, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And you were on deck at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the deck, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Approaching the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just approaching the bridge.

Senator SMITH.

Could you see what had occurred?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I could not see what had occurred.

Senator SMITH.

Did you know what had occurred?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, not at all. I heard the sixth officer [Moody] say what it was.

Senator SMITH.

What did he say that it was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He said we had struck an iceberg.

Senator SMITH.

Was there any evidence of ice on any of the decks, to your knowledge, after that collision?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just a little on the lower deck. On the open deck I saw just a little, not much.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether anyone was injured by that impact?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, I do not know; I never heard.

Senator SMITH.

Did you continue to go toward the bridge after the impact?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

How far did you go?

Mr. BOXHALL.

At the time of the impact I was just coming along the deck and almost abreast of the captain’s quarters, and I heard the report of three bells.

Senator SMITH.

What kind of a report? Describe it.

Mr. BOXHALL.

The lookout’s report.

Senator SMITH.

What was said?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Three bells were struck.

Senator SMITH.

Three bells?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That signifies something has been seen ahead. Almost at the same time I heard the first officer give the order “Hard astarboard,” and the engine telegraph rang.

Senator SMITH.

What did the order mean?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Ordering the ship’s head to port.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see this iceberg at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not at that time.

Senator SMITH.

Did it extend above the deck that you were on?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, no, sir, it did not extend there.

Senator SMITH.

A little lower?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether it struck the bow squarely?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It seemed to me to strike the bluff of the bow.

Senator SMITH.

Describe that.

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is in the forward part of the ship, but almost on the side.

Senator SMITH.

On which side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is just where the ship begins to widen out on the starboard side.

Senator SMITH.

How far would that be from the front of the ship?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know.

Senator SMITH.

About how far?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say in feet.

Senator SMITH.

How far would it be from the eyes?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know. I could not say.

Senator SMITH.

You could not describe that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; you could measure it on the plans, though.

Senator SMITH.

About how far?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say how many feet. I have no idea of the number of feet.

Senator SMITH.

But it was not a square blow on the bow of the ship?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

In ordinary parlance, would it be a glancing blow?

Mr. BOXHALL.

A glancing blow.

Senator SMITH.

Was the blow felt immediately?

Mr. BOXHALL.

A slight impact.

Senator SMITH.

How slight?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It did not seem to me to be very serious. I did not take it seriously.

Senator SMITH.

Slight enough to stop you in your walk to the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, no, no, no.

Senator SMITH.

Heavy enough to stop you, I mean?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

So slight that you did not regard it as serious?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not think it was serious.

Senator SMITH.

Did you proceed to the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Whom did you find there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I found the sixth officer and the first officer and captain. [Moody, Murdoch and Captain Smith]

Senator SMITH.

The sixth officer, the first officer and the captain?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

All on the bridge together?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

What, if anything, was said by the captain?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir. The captain said, “What have we struck?” Mr. Murdoch, the first officer, said, “We have struck an iceberg.”

Senator SMITH.

Then what was said?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He followed on to say – Mr. Murdoch followed on to say, “I put her hard astarboard and run the engines full astern, but it was too close; she hit it.”

Senator FLETCHER.

That was before she struck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; after.

Senator SMITH.

That was after she struck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

He said that he put her hard astarboard?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

But it was too late?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And he hit it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

What did the captain say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Murdoch also said, “I intended to port around it.”

Senator SMITH.

“I intended to port around it”?

Mr. BOXHALL.

“But she hit before I could do any more.”

Senator SMITH.

Did he say anything more?

Mr. BOXHALL.

“The watertight doors are closed, sir.”

Senator SMITH.

What did the captain say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Murdoch continued to say, “The watertight doors are closed, sir.”

Senator SMITH.

Mr. Murdoch continued to say, “Are they closed”?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; “They are closed.”

Senator SMITH.

“The watertight doors are closed”?

Mr. BOXHALL.

“Are closed.”

Senator SMITH.

Do you understand by that that he had applied the –

Mr. BOXHALL. (interrupting)

I saw him close them.

Senator SMITH.

He had applied the electricity?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And by that had closed the watertight compartments?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; and the captain asked him if he had rung the warning bell.

Senator SMITH.

What did he say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He said, “Yes, sir.”

Senator SMITH.

What is the warning bell?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is a small electric bell which rings at every watertight door.

Senator SMITH.

And he said that that had been done?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

What else did he say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

We all walked out to the corner of the bridge then to look at the iceberg.

Senator SMITH.

The captain?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The captain, first officer, and myself.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was not very sure of seeing it. It seemed to me to be just a small black mass not rising very high out of the water, just a little on the starboard quarter,

Senator SMITH.

How far out of the water should you judge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not judge the size of it, but it seemed to me to be very, very low lying.

Senator SMITH.

Did it extend up to B deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, no; the ship was past it then. It looked to me to be very, very low in the water.

Senator FLETCHER.

Give us an idea; do not leave it there.

Senator SMITH.

How far do you think it was above the water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is hard to say. In my own opinion I do not think the thing extended above the ship’s rail.

Senator SMITH.

Above the ship’s rail?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

And how far was this rail above the water’s edge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Probably about 30 feet.

Senator SMITH.

About 30 feet?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; hardly 30 feet.

Senator SMITH.

The distance from the water’s edge to the boat deck was how far?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could get that measurement from the plan.

Senator SMITH.

About 70 feet, was it not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

From the boat deck it was about 70 feet to the water’s edge. The boat deck is one deck above A. This rail I mean is on the C deck.

Senator SMITH.

You say this looked like a black object?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Were the stars shining that night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The stars were shining,

Senator SMITH.

And the moon?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No moon.

Senator SMITH.

No moon?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Was it clear?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Clear.

Senator SMITH.

And yet you wish to be understood as saying that, standing in the bow of the ship as far forward as you could get, and looking over directly at this obstacle, you were unable to determine exactly what it was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was not standing in the bow of the ship, sir; I was standing on the bridge.

Senator SMITH.

On the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

But you could see this object, could you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I am not sure of seeing it; that is what I say, I would not swear to seeing it. But I fancied seeing this long-lying growler.

Senator SMITH.

And that it looked dark?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It looked to me as if it was very, very low.

Senator SMITH.

And dark?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Did the captain seem to know what you had struck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Did Mr. Murdoch?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Murdoch saw it when we struck it.

Senator SMITH.

Did he say what it was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

What did he say it was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He said it was an iceberg.

Senator SMITH.

After these signals were turned in, what was done?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know what was done, because I left the bridge then.

Senator SMITH.

Where did you go?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I went right down below, in the lowest steerage, as far as I could possibly get without going into the cargo portion of the ship, and inspected all the decks as I came up, in the vicinity of where I thought she had struck.

Senator SMITH.

What did you find?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I found no damage. I found no indications to show that the ship had damaged herself.

Senator SMITH.

On the inside?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the inside.

Senator SMITH.

Did you say you went to the steerage?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I went down to the steerage.

Senator SMITH.

But found no evidence of injury there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Then where did you go?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Then I went on the bridge and reported to the captain that I could not see any damage.

Senator SMITH.

One moment. Did you look farther, beyond the steerage?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I looked in all the decks. I worked my way up to the top deck.

Senator SMITH.

Looking at all of them in the forward part?

Mr. BOXHALL.

In the forward part of the ship; that is, abreast of No. 2 and 3 hatches.

Senator SMITH.

Then what did you do?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I came right up to the bridge and reported that I could find no damage.

Senator SMITH.

What did the captain say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He said, “Go down and find the carpenter and get him to sound the ship.”

Senator SMITH.

Did you do so?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was proceeding down, but I met the carpenter. [J. Maxwell or J. Hutchinson]

Senator SMITH.

What did you say to him?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I said, “The captain wants you to sound the ship.” He said, “The ship is making water,” and he went on the bridge to the captain, and I thought I would go down forward again and investigate; and then I met a mail clerk, a man named Smith, and he asked where the captain was. I said, “He is on the bridge.” He said, “The mail hold is full” or “filling rapidly.” I said, “Well, you go and report it to the captain and I will go down and see,” and I proceeded right down into the mail room.

Senator SMITH.

What did you find there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I went down as far as the sorting room deck and found mail clerks down there working.

Senator SMITH.

Doing what?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Taking letters out of the racks, they seemed to me to be doing.

Senator SMITH.

Taking letters out of the racks and putting them into pouches?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not see what they were putting them in.

Senator SMITH.

You could not see what disposition they were making of them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I looked through an open door and saw these men working at the racks, and directly beneath me was the mail hold, and the water seemed to be then within 2 feet of the deck we were standing on.

Senator SMITH.

What did you do in that situation?

Mr. BOXHALL. (continuing)

And bags of mail floating about. I went right on the bridge again and reported to the captain what I had seen.

Senator SMITH.

What did he say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He said all right, and then the order came out for the boats.

Senator SMITH.

You mean the order was given to man or lower the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

To clear the lifeboats.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know anything about what the carpenter did after you left him?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I never saw him any more.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know anything about the wireless?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Or what the captain or any other officer did regarding it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

When the order was given to clear the lifeboats, what did you do?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I went around the decks and was clearing the lifeboats; helping take the covers off.

Senator SMITH.

Covers off?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Covers off of the boats, and clearing them generally.

Senator SMITH.

Were they all covered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir, except the sea boats; and assisting generally around the decks. Then I went into the chart room and worked out the ship’s position. I was clearing boats for a little while, and then went in and worked the position out.

Senator SMITH.

Did you report her position?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I submitted her position to the captain.

Senator SMITH.

What did he say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He said, “Take it to the Marconi room.”

Senator SMITH.

Did you do so?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you find the operator in charge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I found the two operators there.

Senator SMITH.

Who?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Phillips and Bride.

Senator SMITH.

What did you do with your information?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There was too much noise of the steam escaping, so I wrote the position down for them and left it.

Senator SMITH.

You simply wrote the position down?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

And handed it to the operator?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Left it on his table there. He saw it. He made a call, and he was listening, and I did not interrupt him.

Senator SMITH.

Did you remain to see what disposition was made of it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Did you keep a copy of that, or do you know exactly what that showed?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That position?

Senator SMITH.

Yes.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I have the position.

Senator SMITH.

Have you a memorandum of it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I have it in my head.

Senator SMITH.

Give it to the reporter.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Forty-one, forty-six; fifty, fourteen.

Senator BURTON.

Give that again.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Forty-one, forty-six, north; fifty, fourteen west.

Senator SMITH.

Was that the last time the ship’s position was taken?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is the position I worked out.

Senator SMITH.

Was that the last time it was taken so far as you know?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; that was the position at the time she struck.

Senator SMITH.

Was that where she sank, do you know?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know. She would just drift a little way farther on, probably half a mile or so.

Senator SMITH.

What did you do after you left the operator’s room?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Went around the decks assisting to clear the decks and send distress signals off.

Senator SMITH.

What do you mean by clearing the decks?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Clearing the boats, I should say.

Senator SMITH.

At that time were passengers on these decks?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Men and women?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Men and women, yes, coming up.

Senator SMITH.

What were they doing?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was too busy to take notice, as a matter of fact.

Senator SMITH.

Did they have life preservers on, or lifebelts?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I think all of them had life preservers that I saw.

Senator SMITH.

Would you be willing to say that, so far as your observation went —

Mr. BOXHALL.

They all had them, I should say, as far as my observation went.

Senator SMITH.

Men and women?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Children?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was around the bridge most of the time.

Senator SMITH.

I want to get your best information about it.

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was around the bridge most of the time, sending off distress signals and endeavoring to signal to a ship that was ahead of us.

Senator SMITH.

Taking the signals from the captain?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Carrying them yourself to the operator?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; distress signals – rockets.

Senator SMITH.

On the ship?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you return again to the wireless room?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

You say these passengers were gathered about on all decks?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not leave the boat deck after that.

Senator SMITH.

You remained on the upper deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the upper deck.

Senator SMITH.

Where these lifeboats were?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Where these lifeboats were.

Senator SMITH.

And did you take part in clearing?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Generally assisting.

Senator SMITH.

Assisting in lowering these lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not in lowering them, sir.

Senator SMITH.

In manning them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir, in manning them; but my attention until the time I left the ship was mostly taken up with firing off distress rockets and trying to signal a steamer that was almost ahead of us.

Senator SMITH.

How far ahead of you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is hard to say. I saw his masthead lights and I saw his side light.

Senator SMITH.

In what direction?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Almost ahead of us.

Senator SMITH.

On the same course, apparently?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; oh, no.

Senator SMITH.

On the same general course?

Mr. BOXHALL.

By the way she was heading she seemed to be meeting us.

Senator SMITH.

Coming toward you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Coming toward us.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know anything about what boat that was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Have you had any information since about it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

None whatever.

Senator SMITH.

You say you fired these rockets and other- wise attempted to signal her?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir. She got close enough, as I thought, to read our electric Morse signal, and I signaled to her; I told her to come at once, we were sinking; and the captain was standing —

Senator SMITH.

This was the signal?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Go ahead.

Mr. BOXHALL.

I told the captain about this ship, and he was with me most of the time when we were signaling.

Senator SMITH.

Did he also see it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did he tell you to do anything else to arrest its attention?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I went over and started the Morse signal. He said, “Tell him to come at once, we are sinking.”

Senator SMITH.

You were sinking already, you say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

“Come at once, we are sinking”?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

What would be that signal?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It was sent in the Morse key, the Morse code.

Senator SMITH.

And you did that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And did you get any reply?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I can not say I saw any reply. Some people say she replied to our rockets and our signals, but I did not see them.

Senator SMITH.

Was any attempt made to get in wireless communication after you saw this boat – what you took to be a boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know what was transpiring in the wireless room.

Senator SMITH.

These signals you utilized were Morse signals?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Are they recognized as standard for the sea?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

Are they a part of the British regulations?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any signals from this ship at all?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I can not say that I saw any signals, except her ordinary steaming light. Some people say they saw signals, but I could not.

Senator SMITH.

In referring to “some people,” whom do you mean?

Mr. BOXHALL.

People who were around the bridge.

Senator SMITH.

Passengers?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I should not say passengers.

Senator SMITH.

Officers?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I think it was stewards.

Senator SMITH.

Stewards; the crew?

Mr. BOXHALL.

And people waiting in the boats, or something.

Senator SMITH.

They saw some of these signals

Mr. BOXHALL.

Some men said they saw her signals.

Senator SMITH.

From what you saw of that vessel, how far would you think she was from the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I should say approximately the ship would be about 5 miles.

Senator SMITH.

What lights did you see?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The two masthead lights and the red light.

Senator SMITH.

Were the two masthead lights the first lights that you could see?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The first lights.

Senator SMITH.

And what other lights?

Mr. BOXHALL.

And then, as she got closer, she showed her side light, her red light.

Senator SMITH.

So you were quite sure she was coming in your direction?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Quite sure.

Senator SMITH.

How long was this before the boat sank?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It is hard to tell. I had no idea of the time then; I do not know what time it was then.

Senator SMITH.

Can you recall about how long it was after the collision?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Was this information communicated to the wireless operators?

Mr. BOXHALL.

What communication, sir?

Senator SMITH.

Was this information communicated to the wireless operators?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not to my knowledge.

Senator SMITH.

Did you know that they had sent out a distress signal?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

And you would expect that this boat would pick it up if they had a wireless on it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

If she had a wireless installation.

Senator SMITH.

You busied yourself with the Morse signals?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did they continue up to the time you assisted in clearing the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I would signal with the Morse and then go ahead and send off a rocket, and then go back and have a look at the ship, until I was finally sent away.

Senator SMITH.

Suppose you had had a searchlight on the bow of that boat, and could have thrown it strongly against this object that you seemed to see, do you think that would have apprised the vessel of its proximity to you and of your distress?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Well, no doubt a searchlight might have called attention to it then.

Senator SMITH.

This ship was not equipped with a searchlight?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The Titanic was not; no.

Senator SMITH.

Have you ever been employed on a ship that was so equipped?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not in the merchant service.

Senator SMITH.

Not in the merchant service?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Any other service?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

In the naval service?

Mr. BOXHALL.

In the naval service.

Senator SMITH.

Is that a part of the equipment of the British naval service?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; all the ships that I have seen have a searchlight.

Senator SMITH.

But not in the merchant service?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not in the merchant service.

Senator SMITH.

In order that the record may be complete, will you kindly explain a little more in detail how the Morse signal is given.

Mr. BOXHALL.

By means of a telegraphic key and a Morse lamp. It is a series of dots and dashes.

Senator SMITH.

Which are reflected?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; there is no reflection at all; it is just simply showing the light in and out – an electric light.

Senator SMITH.

How are the rockets exploded?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The rockets are exploded by a firing lanyard.

Senator SMITH.

They shower?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They go right up into the air and they throw stars.

Senator SMITH.

How strong rockets do they have on these boats – what is the charge; do you know?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know, sir; the Board of Trade regulations govern that.

Senator SMITH.

Did they work satisfactorily?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

So that, so far as your manipulation of these signals and rockets was concerned –

Mr. BOXHALL.

They were quite satisfactory.

Senator SMITH.

The failure to arouse the attention of this ship was not due to any impaired or partial success of these signals?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not at all, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You say you continued to fire the rockets and give the signals?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And then returned to the side of the ship?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And assisted in the work of the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

All about the same time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Now, Mr. Boxhall, how many people were on the boat deck, the upper deck, where these lifeboats were located?

Mr. BOXHALL.

At what time, sir?

Senator SMITH.

At the time you were clearing them; at the time they were lowered – the first ones were lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know what time the first boat was lowered.

Senator SMITH.

Were you there when it was lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was around the bridge, but the first boat that was lowered was lowered away from aft.

Senator SMITH.

Lowered from aft?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the starboard side. I received the communication though the telephone in the wheelhouse that the first boat had been lowered. I did not notice the time.

Senator SMITH.

Who lowered it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know who was aft.

Senator SMITH.

The communication did not tell you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not know who it was that told me through the telephone.

Senator SMITH.

Have you since learned who lowered it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know anything about who was in this first boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, I have not the slightest idea.

Senator SMITH.

You say you did not see it lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see the second boat lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know where it was lowered from?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I have not the slightest idea where it was lowered from.

Senator SMITH.

Whether aft or on the port or the starboard side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not know. The first boat was lowered from aft on the starboard side, I know, because that information was sent through to me on the phone.

Senator SMITH.

But who sent it you do not know? [George T. Rowe alerted the bridge to seeing a lifeboat from his position from the aft docking bridge].

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know.

Senator SMITH.

What did you do after receiving that communication?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I went outside again and was assisting generally.

Senator SMITH.

Where did you go; to which side of the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I went on the port side.

Senator SMITH.

Amidship, or aft, or forward?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Around forward.

Senator SMITH.

Were there any lifeboats forward?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

On each side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

How many?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When I left the ship?

Senator SMITH.

When the ship left Southampton, if you can tell? I want to find out the location of the lifeboats.

Mr. BOXHALL.

They were equally divided on the boat deck, the port side and the starboard side.

Senator SMITH.

Fore and aft?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Fore and aft.

Senator SMITH.

How many would be forward?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There were 14 lifeboats. That would be 7 on either side.

Senator SMITH.

Were these lifeboats all along the side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Continuously? There was no division between those amidship and those forward?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You say there were how many on a side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Seven on either side. I never counted them, but I think there were 7. There were 14 lifeboats and 2 sea boats. They were equally divided.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any of these lifeboats filled or lowered on the starboard side, either forward or aft?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw some one filling the starboard emergency boat at the time that I went and was firing off rockets. I fired them just close to the bows of this emergency boat.

Senator SMITH.

There were only two emergency boats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is all; but that one I noticed, because these distress rockets are dangerous things if they explode, and I had to keep people away clear while I fired the rockets.

Senator SMITH.

On the port side you could have seen but one. There was one on each side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

You could have seen but one, and that was at the boat deck. Was it being lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw it just before it was lowered, and then I fired a rocket after it was lowered.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know who was in that boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not know who was in it. I did not notice who was working at the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know how many of the crew were in that boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not.

Senator SMITH.

Or how many passengers?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I have not the slightest idea.

Senator SMITH.

Or who the passengers were?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Or whether they were men or women?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There were men in it.

Senator SMITH.

Men and women?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

In about what proportions?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say. My business – I was intent on sending out these rockets and did not stop to look.

Senator SMITH.

Is that the only boat you saw lowered or filled?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not see them in the act of lowering that boat.

Senator SMITH.

Well, filling?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw the people in it.

Senator SMITH.

Is that the only one?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I noticed other boats being filled, but I did not notice who was filling them. At such a time as that one does not stop to look who is doing things.

Senator SMITH.

I understand that. Did you see the other boats of the same type lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was in it when it was lowered.

Senator SMITH.

You were in it. When was it lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know the time.

Senator SMITH.

Could you tell the order in which they were lowered, whether this was the second or third or fourth?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When I was lowered away I was the last boat but one on the port side. There was one of the lifeboats lowered away after I left, a few minutes after I left, and then there were no more boats hanging in the davits on the port side.

Senator SMITH.

Was there not one boat that was entangled in the gear and could not be lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; not that I know of. I never heard about it and did not see it.

Senator SMITH.

As far as you can recollect, all of the lifeboats –

Mr. BOXHALL.

As far as I can recollect, and from what I have heard, everything worked very smoothly in lowering the boats.

Senator SMITH.

And all of the lifeboats had been lowered when the boat that you got in was lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

All but one.

Senator SMITH.

Where was that one?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That was the next boat to me, aft.

Senator SMITH.

A lifeboat or a collapsible?

Mr. BOXHALL.

A lifeboat.

Senator SMITH.

Did you have anything to do with filling these boats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was assisting to get people along there, but I was not standing at the side of the boat, lifting them in, actually.

Senator SMITH.

What can you say about the anxiety of people to get into these boats; was there great anxiety?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I can not say that I saw that.

Senator SMITH.

What can you say as to whether they were reluctant to get in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not notice that, either.

Senator SMITH.

Were there many people on the boat deck when you got into this boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Were there any people at all?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There were some around by the other boat.

Senator SMITH.

Anyone you knew?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not notice.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Mr. Ismay at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir. The last time I saw Mr. Ismay was some little while before I came away from the ship in my boat.

Senator SMITH.

Before you came away?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And you did not see him after that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Mr. Lightoller at that time – when you got in, I mean?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir. I saw Mr. Wilde.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Mr. Lowe or Mr. Pitman at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Mr. Murdoch at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; only Mr. Wilde and the captain.

Senator SMITH.

Where was the captain?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The captain was standing by this emergency boat.

Senator SMITH.

The one you got in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

How far from it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He was standing by the wheelhouse door, just abreast of this boat.

Senator SMITH.

By the wheelhouse door, just abreast of this boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

What was he doing?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Supervising the boats being loaded, I think.

Senator SMITH.

Loaded?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Supervising passengers being put into the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Did he tell you to get in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

What did he say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He told me I had to get into that boat and go away.

Senator SMITH.

Did any other officer get into that boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Any other member of the crew?

Mr. BOXHALL.

One man was in it.

Senator SMITH.

Who was that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know his name, sir; I forgot. [Frank Osman]

Senator SMITH.

What was his occupation?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Sailorman.

Senator SMITH.

But you do not know who he was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There was one sailorman, one steward [James Johnston], and one cook [John Ellis] ; that is all.

Senator SMITH.

There were four men in that boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

And one passenger.

Senator SMITH.

A sailorman, a steward, a cook, yourself, and one male passenger?

Mr. BOXHALL.

One male passenger.

Senator SMITH.

Who was that passenger?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He was a saloon passenger who did not speak English. He had a black beard. [Anton Kink]

Senator SMITH.

How old a man, apparently?

Mr. BOXHALL.

A middle-aged man.

Senator SMITH.

Did he seem to have any family there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I think he had his wife there, and some children.

Senator SMITH.

Did she get in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The boat was already loaded; I did not see the passengers being put in.

Senator SMITH.

The boat was full?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, it seemed to me to be pretty full. The order was given to lower the boats away when I was sent to her.

Senator SMITH.

How long was this before the ship sank?

Mr. BOXHALL.

As near as I can judge, it seems to me about 20 minutes to half an hour.

Senator SMITH.

Before the ship sank?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see the captain after that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Not at all?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

How far were you from the ship when it sank?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I suppose I was about a half a mile away.

Senator SMITH.

Going in what direction?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Resting on the oars.

Senator SMITH.

Did all the men in that boat handle oars?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did any women handle oars?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was handling one oar and a lady was assisting me with it. But she was not compelled to do it; she was not asked to do it.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know who she was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you find out afterwards who she was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I did not find out, at all.

Senator SMITH.

You did not ask her to do that, you say?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

It was a voluntary service?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Voluntary service.

Senator SMITH.

You were resting on your oars about half a mile from the place where the ship went down?

Mr. BOXHALL.

About half a mile.

Senator SMITH.

When you left the ship’s side, were there others trying to get into your boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Men or women?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

As you proceeded from the ship’s side did you see anyone in the water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; not at all.

Senator SMITH.

Did you encounter anyone in the water, at all, after you entered the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you ever return to the Titanic after leaving its side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I pulled around the ship’s stern and was intending to go alongside, and tried to see if I could get alongside of the ship again.

Senator SMITH.

What for?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I reckoned I could take about three more people off the boat with safety.

Senator SMITH.

Who made that suggestion to you, anyone?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Did the suggestion come from a woman passenger, or did you do it of your own motion?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did it of my own accord. I was in charge of the boat.

Senator SMITH.

And you swung it around how close to the side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I kept a little distance off the ship.

Senator SMITH.

How far off?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Well, probably a hundred yards or so.

Senator SMITH.

Did anyone make any attempt to get into the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No. Oh, no; there was no rush.

Senator SMITH.

And did you halloo to anyone to come?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No. I was hoping to be able to get alongside of the ship again.

Senator SMITH.

Why did you not get close?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Because when I got so close as that I thought it was wiser not to go any closer, and I put it to the people –

Senator SMITH.

Wiser for what?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Because there was only one man who understood my orders as to how to handle a boat.

Senator SMITH.

Did you feel you were in danger from suction?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Was there any suction?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I think there was a little suction.

Senator SMITH.

How much?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The boat seemed to be drawn closer to the ship. I think, myself, that there was more suction while the ship was settling bodily. That was shortly after we were lowered into the boat. I think there was more suction then than there was when she actually went down, because I pulled some distance off then.

Senator SMITH.

You were not close enough to know actually what the suction was when she actually sank, or as she actually sank?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

As a matter of fact, there was not much suction, was there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not think there was the suction that the people really thought there was. I was really surprised, myself.

Senator SMITH.

You were rather surprised, and all these officers were rather surprised, were they not, that there was so little suction?

Mr. BOXHALL.

By hearsay, it seems to have been a general surprise to everybody that there was so little suction.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know who the passenger was who got into the boat – the man?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Have you ever seen him since then?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I have not.

Senator SMITH.

You did not see him aboard the Carpathia?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir. There was a lady there whom I asked to steer the boat according to my orders. I asked her to pull the tiller toward her or away.

Senator SMITH.

Was that Mrs. Douglas?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mrs. Douglas, and she assisted me greatly in doing that.

Senator SMITH.

Then you were in Mrs. Douglas’s boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see her afterwards?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; on board the Carpathia.

Senator SMITH.

And you talked with her?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I had a talk with her.

Senator SMITH.

Have you seen her since?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Her husband did not survive?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; he did not.

Senator SMITH.

She took the tiller of the lifeboat and steered it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And you pulled on an oar?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know, with reference to the other lifeboats, when yours reached the side of the Carpathia.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; it was the first one there.

Senator SMITH.

Who was the first person to step out of your boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That I do not know.

Senator SMITH.

You do not remember whether it was Mrs. Douglas or yourself –

Mr. BOXHALL.

It was not myself, because I handed everybody out before I came out.

Senator SMITH.

Did you step onto a little bridge there on the side of the Carpathia?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

On some little steps that went up the side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There was a stepladder up the side.

Senator SMITH.

A direct ladder?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; a direct ladder.

Senator SMITH.

And you assisted the passengers to that ladder?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, put the rope over their heads; put their arms through a rope, and then assisted them up in that way.

Senator SMITH.

Did you land all the passengers in your boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, everyone.

Senator SMITH.

Aboard the Carpathia?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Can you give the hour when you went alongside?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir. They told me on board the Carpathia afterwards that it was about 10 minutes after 4, approximately.

Senator SMITH.

Had you been rowing or lying on your oars from the time you left the Titanic until –

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I had been showing green lights most of the time. I had been showing pyrotechnic lights on the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Your boat was equipped with lights?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Were any of the other lifeboats so equipped, or did you see any lights of that character on the other boats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not of that character; no, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Between the time you left the Titanic and the time you reached the Carpathia, I mean?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Then you could not tell exactly when your lifeboat was lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

What is the full complement of a lifeboat of the size you were in, when lowered and fitted for an emergency – the official complement?

Mr. BOXHALL.

You do not mean for “Man overboard,” or anything like that?

Senator SMITH.

No; what is the rule with reference to manning the lifeboats, how many sailors or seamen or officers are ordinarily required to take charge of a lifeboat in such an emergency?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Well, you want at least two men.

Senator SMITH.

At least two?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Two men who understand orders in a boat to do the pulling, and one man to give the orders and do the steering.

Senator SMITH.

And how many were there in your boat – four?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I had three men pulling, and myself.

Senator SMITH.

And yourself signaling; and the male passenger?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Well, the male passenger did not do much.

Senator SMITH.

He could not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He did not.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know of your own knowledge how many men Mr. Lightoller put into the first boat he lowered on the port side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I do not.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see the Titanic sink?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I can not say that I saw her sink. I saw the lights go out, and I looked two or three minutes afterward and it was 25 minutes past 2. So I took it that when she sank would be about 20 minutes after 2.

Senator SMITH.

How far were you from her then?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I would say we were then about three-fourths of a mile from her.

Senator SMITH.

So you are unable to tell what scenes were then transpiring on the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you have any conversation with Mr. Ismay that night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Where?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On board of the ship.

Senator SMITH.

At what time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the bridge, probably about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before I came away in the boat.

Senator SMITH.

On the bridge, about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before you went down over the side in the lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you know him personally?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

How long had you known him?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I had known him by sight for about three years. He has crossed before in some ships I have been in.

Senator SMITH.

What did he say to you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He asked me why I did not get the people in the boat and get away?

Senator SMITH.

What did you say to him?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I told him the boat’s crew were ready, and the boat was ready to be put away when the captain’s order was given.

Senator SMITH.

And the order had not yet been given?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Was that all that was said?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is all.

Senator SMITH.

Did he say anything about himself?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; he passed on, then.

Senator SMITH.

Who was with him at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He was standing alone at that time.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see him on the boat deck or on the bridge when you entered the lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I cannot say that I did.

Senator SMITH.

On which side was the lifeboat that you were on?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The port side.

Senator SMITH.

Was Mr. Lightoller there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not see Mr. Lightoller.

Senator SMITH.

Was he on the port side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes. I think most of the time that I saw Mr. Lightoller he was working on that side, but in the latter part I did not see him.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether he had charge of that side in loading the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Well, I do not know that he had charge when the chief officer was there; the chief officer, I mean, who was there when my boat was sent away.

Senator SMITH.

Do you refer to the captain when you say the chief officer?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I refer to the chief officer, Mr. Wilde.

Senator SMITH.

The captain was there also?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; but Mr. Wilde superintended the loading of the boats.

Senator SMITH.

Mr. Wilde superintended lowering the boats on the port side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not say the boats on the port side; I say he superintended the boat I was on.

Senator SMITH.

That boat was on the port side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That was on the port side.

Senator SMITH.

So if Mr. Lightoller took charge of the port side in lowering these lifeboats he did so after you left?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He was working down the port side most of the time right from the first. I never saw Mr. Lightoller on the starboard side. Whenever I did see him it was on the port side.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Mr. Murdoch?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

On the starboard side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw Mr. Murdoch on the port side at times.

Senator SMITH.

But you do not know whether he had charge of the lifeboats on the starboard side or not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not know.

Senator SMITH.

You say you did not see Mr. Ismay after you saw him on the bridge and before the order had been given to clear the lifeboats or lower the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not see him; no, sir.

Senator SMITH.

When did you next see him?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When he came alongside in the collapsible boat outside of the Carpathia.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know what boat that was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know any number; it was a collapsible boat.

Senator SMITH.

How soon after you reached there did it appear at the side of the Carpathia?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It was one of the last boats that came.

Senator SMITH.

And it was a collapsible boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; it was a collapsible boat.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know the number?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know any number for it.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know who was in it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Mr. Carter was in it. I saw Mr. Carter.

Senator SMITH.

Who was Mr. Carter?

Mr. BOXHALL.

A passenger.

Senator SMITH.

Where does he reside?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I have not the slightest idea.

Senator SMITH.

Is he an American?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know that, either.

Senator SMITH.

Was Mr. Carter in the same boat as Mr. Ismay?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Were there any other men in that boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I saw some men who looked to me like Filipinos.

Senator SMITH.

Foreigners?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

How many?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know whether there were three or four of them.

Senator SMITH.

Were there any women or children in the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; it was full of them.

Senator SMITH.

How many were in the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I will not say that it was full of women and children. Now I come to think of it, there was a foreigner there, a steerage passenger who could not speak English – a man.

Senator SMITH.

How many of these Filipinos were there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Three or four.

Senator SMITH.

And Mr. Ismay, Mr. Carter, and this foreigner who could not speak English?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Were there any other men in there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not that I know of; I can not say. I did not take that much notice. One did not stop to look what men were there in the boats or who they were; it was just a case of passing them out.

Senator SMITH.

Exactly; but could you see who held the oars or who propelled the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I did not notice that.

Senator SMITH.

About how long was it after you arrived before the other boats arrived?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The first boat did not arrive until at least half an hour after I arrived there.

Senator SMITH.

You arrived there and had a half hour intervene?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; and then I had passed up crews from either two or three boats from the same gangway before Mr. Ismay came.

Senator SMITH.

Was it daylight?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It was quite daylight; yes.

Senator SMITH.

Was the Carpathia under way?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; not at the time.

Senator SMITH.

How far do you think she was from the place where the Titanic sank?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When was this, sir?

Senator SMITH.

When Mr. Ismay’s boat appeared.

Mr. BOXHALL.

I can not say that, either, because we pulled off a little way, as the Carpathia was steaming toward our green lights.

Senator SMITH.

She saw your lights?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

As a matter of fact, were there any other lights visible on the lifeboats except those on your boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw some lifeboat lights, but the usual lifeboat’s lights. They were very dim, small lamps.

Senator SMITH.

If all those lifeboats had been lighted, it would have impressed itself upon you, would it not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Lighted the same –

Senator SMITH.

The same as yours?

Mr. BOXHALL.

But this was a box of green lights that happened to be thrown into the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Accidentally?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; not accidentally.

Senator SMITH.

Intentionally.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; because I told the man to put them in.

Senator SMITH.

Was it a part of the equipment of the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; it was not a part of the equipment; but I told him to put them in for anybody that would happen to find them.

Senator SMITH.

I see. And after the boat was lowered you lighted them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Did they make a brilliant light?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; a very brilliant light.

Senator SMITH.

You think the Carpathia steamed toward these lights?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They did.

Senator SMITH.

And you say that is the reason they reached you first?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Did you notice any lights burning on any of the other lifeboats when you had boarded the Carpathia? I assume that you were looking at these boats.

Mr. BOXHALL.

When I had boarded the Carpathia, no.

Senator SMITH.

No other lights were visible on other lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; because it was daylight. It was daylight before I got my passengers on board the ship.

Senator SMITH.

Well, that is all right. But let us clear up the light business just a little more, so that we may have an accurate record on that point. Could you say of your own knowledge that any other lifeboat than the one you were in had lights burning on it when it came alongside or just preceding its coming alongside of the Carpathia?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw several of the boats – in fact all of the lifeboats – when I was in my boat, which had lighted lamps in them.

Senator SMITH.

Had lamps in them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Had lamps in them – before I saw the Carpathia.

Senator SMITH.

Before you saw the Carpathia?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Where were those lights displayed?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was not close enough to see.

Senator SMITH.

Where would they be displayed – on the forward end?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Usually by the man who steers the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Back of the tiller?

Mr. BOXHALL.

In the bottom of the boat, not back of the tiller.

Senator SMITH.

I do not mean back of the tiller, but back near the tiller?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just in the bottom of the boat. I could see the reflection of the lights; I did not see the lights themselves.

Senator SMITH.

But you are not ready to say that they all had lights burning, are you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; not that they all had lights burning, but I saw several.

Senator SMITH.

Now, Mr. Boxhall, did you personally become acquainted with any of the American passengers on that boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On what boat?

Senator SMITH.

On the Titanic.

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; not until after the accident. After we got on board the Carpathia I met one or two.

Senator SMITH.

But were you aware at any time between Southampton and the place of this accident of the presence on shipboard of a large number of Americans?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you at any time learn who they were?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; by glancing through the passenger list.

Senator SMITH.

Can you tell any names that you now particularly recall?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I recall that Col. Astor and his wife were aboard.

Senator SMITH.

You recall that you saw Col. Astor’s name on this list?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Did you personally see him or his wife?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I have seen him walking on the top deck.

Senator SMITH.

Did you know who he was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

One of the officers – I think it was one of the officers who told me.

Senator SMITH.

Any other Americans?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not know any others that I could name.

Senator SMITH.

And Canadians of prominence?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Or any other passengers of prominence, or any other passenger at all whose name you remember?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I do not remember the names of them.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see Col. Astor after this collision occurred?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Or his wife?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I never saw his wife at all.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know what part of the ship they were in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I have not the slightest idea.

Senator SMITH.

I mean as to their quarters.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I understand what you mean.

Senator SMITH.

Did you know of the presence of any other Americans than the ones you have mentioned particularly?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

About how long, if you remember, before you reached the side of the Carpathia did you see these lights extinguished on the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Before I boarded the Carpathia, you say?

Senator SMITH.

Yes.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Before I boarded the Carpathia. Well, the Titanic’s lights seem to have disappeared some considerable time before I boarded the Carpathia, because I saw the Carpathia’s lights for some considerable time.

Senator SMITH.

After you boarded the Carpathia during that early morning, Monday morning, or after you left the Titanic’s side, did you see any icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not until I got within about two or three ship’s lengths of the Carpathia, when I saw her engines were stopped – then I saw the icebergs; it was just breaking daylight then.

Senator SMITH.

Where were they?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Close to the Carpathia.

Senator SMITH.

How close?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He seemed to have stopped within half a mile or quarter of a mile of the berg.

Senator SMITH.

How many did you see?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Numerous bergs. As daylight broke I saw them.

Senator SMITH.

About how many?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I would not like to say.

Senator SMITH.

More than two?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Certainly more than two. Several bergs.

Senator SMITH.

That is four or five or six?

Mr. BOXHALL.

And field ice. I could see field ice then as far as the eye could see.

Senator SMITH.

How large were these icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Well, I did not see any of them that I considered large icebergs – not like one sees in the Canadian trade.

Senator SMITH.

Did you hear the captain of the Carpathia testify last Friday morning in New York?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was up there when he started, but I did not stay in the committee room.

Senator SMITH.

Did you hear him say that he saw icebergs Monday morning, or an iceberg, nearly 200 feet high?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I did not hear him say that.

Senator SMITH.

You say that you were within about half a mile of an iceberg and that the Carpathia was within that range of one?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I should say she would be well within half a mile of an iceberg when I boarded her.

Senator SMITH.

How did this iceberg look to you? I mean as to color?

Mr. BOXHALL.

White.

Senator SMITH.

Did they all look about the same color?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They looked white to me, in the sunlight.

Senator SMITH.

Was the sun up, then?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; but after the sun got up they looked white.

Senator SMITH.

In the early morning, at the dawn – daybreak?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; at daybreak they looked quite black.

Senator SMITH.

Was it after daybreak when you got alongside of the Carpathia?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Day was breaking. I only saw them a little while before I got to the Carpathia.

Senator SMITH.

Do you care to correct your statement that they appeared white when you last saw them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They did not appear white when I first saw them.

Senator SMITH.

How did they appear?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They appeared black.

Senator SMITH.

After you boarded the Carpathia, while she was cruising around the scene of the wreck, did you see other icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

How many?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say. There were numerous icebergs; that is the easiest way or the best way to express it.

Senator SMITH.

Did you distinguish between an iceberg and a growler, or are they the same thing in the language of mariners?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, I do make a distinction between an iceberg and a growler.

Senator SMITH.

Let us have that distinction.

Mr. BOXHALL.

As I understand a growler, it is a low-lying iceberg.

Senator SMITH.

Partially submerged?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They are all submerged; but I mean one lying, it might be, very largely on the surface of the water, but not high; it might be large or it might be small, but it is low lying.

Senator SMITH.

And the larger it gets –

Mr. BOXHALL.

Then it gets to be an iceberg.

Senator SMITH.

There is another kind of ice that you encounter –

Mr. BOXHALL.

Field ice.

Senator SMITH.

Off the Grand Banks.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

What is that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Field ice is a lot of ice all together.

Senator SMITH.

Like a raft?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; not unlike a raft, I should say. It is a large expanse of ice covering the water.

Senator SMITH.

Level with the surface?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, a little above the surface.

Senator SMITH.

Rising above the surface?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just a little above the surface.

Senator SMITH.

And extending over how great an area? I suppose they vary, but how great an area have you seen covered?

Mr. BOXHALL.

With ice?

Senator SMITH.

With ice, on the sea, in the vicinity of the Grand Banks.

Mr. BOXHALL.

This is the first time that I have seen field ice on the Grand Banks.

Senator SMITH.

You have never seen it on the Grand Banks before?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

And you have been on the Grand Banks before?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

How often?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I have been running to New York since I was 19 years of age.

Senator SMITH.

And you have never seen any field ice?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I have seen icebergs, but have never seen any field ice before.

Senator SMITH.

Was the ship on its usual course?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Have you ever crossed at this time of the year before?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes; many times.

Senator SMITH.

Can you tell what the theory of the navigator is as to where the icebergs and growlers and field ice come from?

Mr. BOXHALL.

As far as I understand, they come from the Arctic region.

Senator SMITH.

What are they composed of, if you know?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Some people who have been very close to them tell me that they have seen sand and gravel and rocks and things of that kind in them.

Senator SMITH.

Rocks and other substances?

Mr. BOXHALL.

And earth. I have never been close enough to see that.

Senator SMITH.

I suppose you mean the icebergs, when you say that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The icebergs; yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And those icebergs are supposed to come from the Arctic regions?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; so I believe.

Senator SMITH.

And float down into the open sea?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

How far east have you ever seen them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know how far east I have seen them. It has been many years since I have seen any, until this time.

Senator SMITH.

Is it understood by mariners and navigators that they are more frequent in the latitude of the Grand Banks?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Around 50 west; 47 to 50 west, I think, as near as I can remember.

Senator SMITH.

From 47 to 50 west they are known to exist?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

And it is customary to be particularly careful in that vicinity?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Well, how did it happen that in that identical vicinity it was not thought necessary to increase the lookout?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know. The lookout may have been increased; I can not say. I was busy most of the watch in the chart room, making calculations.

Senator SMITH.

As far as you know of your own knowledge, it was not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not hear any extra lookouts reported as being put on.

Senator SMITH.

You did not see any extra officers that night, forward on the bridge deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

How far did the Carpathia run on Monday before she was out of sight of the icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say.

Senator SMITH.

Were you not observing the situation?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Between the time that you left the Titanic and the time morning dawned did you see any icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; but I know that they were there.

Senator SMITH.

You knew they were there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; sir.

Senator SMITH.

Any growlers?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw nothing; but I heard the water on the ice as soon as the lights went out on the ship.

Senator SMITH.

That water, you think, was on the ice, after the boat went down? That is, you could hear something?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

In that vicinity?

Mr. BOXHALL.

A little while after the ship’s lights went out and the cries subsided, then I found out that we were near the ice.

Senator SMITH.

You could hear it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Does your statement also cover the field ice?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; it covers all the ice, sir. I heard the water rumbling or breaking on the ice. Then I knew that there was a lot of ice about; but I could not see it from the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know what precautions the captain of the Carpathia took when he found himself among ice?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether he doubled his lookout?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know.

Senator SMITH.

He proceeded toward New York how long after all the lifeboats had been raised?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It was approximately, I should say, well on in the forenoon, when he set the course to New York.

Senator SMITH.

That is, 9 or 10 o’clock?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I think it was well after that. We were steaming around the wreckage for quite a long time. I did not notice the time, but it must have been quite late in the forenoon.

Senator SMITH.

Steaming around –

Mr. BOXHALL.

Steaming around the scene of disaster.

Senator SMITH.

Where were you when they were steaming around?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was on the bridge for a few minutes, shortly after we got the boats on board.

Senator SMITH.

For how long?

Mr. BOXHALL.

About a quarter of an hour, I think.

Senator SMITH.

And remained on the bridge of the Carpathia after the boats were all raised?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any bodies floating in the water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I remained on the bridge until he started off for New York direct. I do not know what time that was.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any floating bodies?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw one floating body, sir.

Senator SMITH.

That of a man or woman?

Mr. BOXHALL.

A man, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see the face distinctly?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I could not. It had a life preserver on.

Senator SMITH.

Dead?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes; quite dead.

Senator SMITH.

How do you know?

Mr. BOXHALL.

We could see by the way the body was lying.

Senator SMITH.

What is the ordinary position of a dead body in the water with a life preserver on?

Mr. BOXHALL.

This body looked as if the man was lying as if he had fallen asleep with his face over his arm.

Senator SMITH.

On his side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On his side.

Senator SMITH.

Were you near enough to describe his features?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not at all, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Is that the only body you saw?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is the only body I saw.

Senator SMITH.

The only body you saw either dead or alive?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; dead or alive.

Senator SMITH.

There must have been hundreds of bodies in the water about the Titanic.

Mr. BOXHALL.

No one ever saw any, at all.

Senator SMITH.

You say they were all equipped with lifebelts?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not remember seeing anybody without a lifebelt.

Senator SMITH.

Did you know of any persons refusing to enter the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; only by hearsay.

Senator SMITH.

Did you hear that many had refused to enter the lifeboats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I heard it on board the Carpathia, that some of them had refused.

Senator SMITH.

Well, those on board the Carpathia had not refused. You heard that others had refused?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I heard that others had refused.

Senator SMITH.

Did you hear any names given of those who had refused?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know. I may have heard the names and not taken any notice, not knowing them.

Senator SMITH.

Could you repeat them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I could not.

Senator SMITH.

Any of them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, I could not.

Senator SMITH.

Were any of the names you heard the names of women as well as men?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any person – man, woman, or child – who refused to get into a lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any man, woman, or child refused permission to get into a lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any man, woman, or child ejected from a lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any man or woman attempt to reach a lifeboat while you were on the deck or when your lifeboat was in the water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Do you mean to rush it, or get in quietly?

Senator SMITH.

To struggle to get in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I did not.

Senator SMITH.

To try to get in or attempt to get in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw several get in, but all I saw try to get in got in.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any get in from the water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see anyone in the water attempt to get in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not see anyone in the water. It was dark, sir.

Senator SMITH.

So you could not see anyone?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not see anybody in the water. I was looking around for them, keeping my eyes open, but I did not see anyone.

Senator SMITH.

If you had seen some one in the water, what would you have done?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Taken them in the boat at once.

Senator SMITH.

No matter whether its capacity was apparently taxed or not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I should have taken them in the boat.

Senator SMITH.

You would not have left them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

If you had seen any struggling man or woman in the water –

Mr. BOXHALL.

I should have taken them in as far as safety would allow; but I did not see anyone in the water.

Senator SMITH.

On that particular morning the water was calm?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Perfectly calm.

Senator SMITH.

And unruffled, was it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Perfectly calm.

Senator SMITH.

So that each boat could have accommodated its full capacity?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes.

Senator SMITH.

Safely?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

How many people were in your boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I estimate about 25, as near as I can tell.

Senator SMITH.

Was that its full capacity?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I reckoned between 25 and 30 that the boat had in her. I did not find out exactly how many she had. I think 30 would be about all she could carry.

Senator SMITH.

You did not count them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I tried to count them.

Senator SMITH.

But you did not succeed?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There were some people in the boat that did not speak English, who did not answer.

Senator SMITH.

But you could count them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not count them.

Senator SMITH.

You could not see them or could not make them answer?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not make them answer.

Senator SMITH.

You tried to count them by having each –

Mr. BOXHALL.

Sing out his number.

Senator SMITH.

Sing out his number?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

And you could not see with your eyes sufficiently plainly to count them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I could not. Then I found out that I had more people in the boat than I thought I had, perhaps.

Senator SMITH.

How many did you have?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not count them.

Senator SMITH.

But you found you had more than you thought you had? How did you find that out?

Mr. BOXHALL.

By the time it took me to discharge that boat in smooth water. They were crawling out from under thwarts and everywhere. That is the way I found it out.

Senator FLETCHER.

You were not in a lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

In a small lifeboat.

Senator FLETCHER.

Not a collapsible boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; not a collapsible boat.

Senator FLETCHER.

A sea boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

You divide them into three classes of boats: First, the lifeboats that hold 65 people; second, the sea boats that hold 25 or 30?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator FLETCHER.

And the collapsible boats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator FLETCHER.

You were not in a lifeboat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was in a sea boat.

Senator NEWLANDS.

Just let me ask you one question. You say you could not see any of those icebergs until dawn, but you heard the lapping of the water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Will you repeat that question?

Senator NEWLANDS.

I understand you to say that you could not see any of those icebergs until dawn, but that you heard the lapping of the water against the icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; that is what I said.

Senator NEWLANDS.

That was a clear night was it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Perfectly clear; starlight. You could almost see the stars set.

Senator NEWLANDS.

How do you account for the fact that you could not see the icebergs, if the night was so clear?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know. I do not know what it was about it. I could not understand. Of course, sound travels quite a long way on the water, and being so close to the water, and it being such a calm night, you would hear the water lapping on those bergs for quite a long, long ways.

Senator NEWLANDS.

In your experience on the water, had you come across many icebergs prior to this time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I have come across a good few, I suppose.

Senator NEWLANDS.

It is always difficult to see them at night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, not always; not always. On such a night as that, even if there is no moon, you can very, very often see an iceberg by the water on the sides of it; that is, if there is a little breeze. But when the water is in one of those oily calms –

Senator NEWLANDS.

Will you speak a little louder?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It was like an oily calm when the Titanic struck, and for a long, long time after we were in the boats, and you could not see anything at all then.

Senator NEWLANDS.

You judge of the presence of icebergs, then, by the appearance of the water around the icebergs and not by the sight of bergs themselves; is that it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On such a night as that, yes.

Senator NEWLANDS.

And when the sea is smooth it is difficult, then, to discern this appearance?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes. I think if there had been a little ripple on the water we should have stood a very good chance of seeing that iceberg in time to miss it – in time, to clear it.

Senator SMITH.

We will adjourn now until 10 o’clock tomorrow morning, and I desire to ask you to be present promptly in the morning, Mr. Boxhall, and we will try and hasten our examination as fast as possible.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Testimony of Joseph G. Boxhall, recalled

Senator SMITH.

You were sworn the other day.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You were the fourth officer on the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Senator Fletcher wants to ask you some questions.

Senator FLETCHER.

Mr. Boxhall, do you know whether the air ports on the Titanic were closed at the time of the collision, or before or just afterwards?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The air ports? I do not know what the air ports are.

Senator FLETCHER.

The port holes.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, the port holes? No; I could not say about that, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

You gave no order to have them closed?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not hear any orders.

Senator FLETCHER.

You do not know whether they were closed or not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

If they were not closed –

Mr. BOXHALL.

The ports I saw down below in the steerage, when I first visited down there a few moments after the ship struck, to the best of my memory were closed. That was in the fore part of the ship, between the forecastle head and the bridge. Those ports, to the best of my memory, were closed.

Senator FLETCHER.

You did not have occasion to observe them anywhere else?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir

Senator FLETCHER.

What was the custom or practice on the ship as to leaving them open in calm weather?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say about that, but in foggy weather it had to be reported on the bridge whether they were open or closed, and in bad weather, of course, if there was any sea at all running, we knew then about the ports, and the orders were given from the bridge. But in calm weather, I am at a loss to remember what was done about them.

Senator FLETCHER.

I understood you to say in your direct examination that you had no knowledge of the presence of icebergs; that no information of that kind reached you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not remember any information coming on Sunday. There were icebergs reported from the captain of the Touraine [La Touraine], some time previously; it might have been a couple of days before. I put their position on the chart, and found that those positions were considerably north of the track. In fact, they were between the northern track and the southern track.

Later, more positions came. I did not remember the name especially, but as soon as I saw the positions as shown at the time of the meeting of the committee, or when some member of the committee showed me those positions, with the name of the German boat, the Amerika, I recognized the positions. So they were evidently those of the Amerika that had been sent. I put those on the chart. I do not remember that any of them were on the track. To the best of my knowledge they were all to the northward of the track.

Senator FLETCHER.

How far north?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I really did not calculate the distance. As soon as I saw they were on the north track I did not bother about measuring the distance.

Senator FLETCHER.

How far ahead of the ship?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not measure that, either. Of course, it was before we turned the corner.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you have any information at all that would lead you to appreciate the fact that the Titanic was approaching ice fields, or a position where icebergs were liable to be found?

Mr. BOXHALL.

From all the positions of icebergs that I had, of course I knew that we should be getting close up to those positions in the early hours of the middle watch; at least. I did not think we should be up to any of those positions before midnight that night.

Senator FLETCHER.

Have you had any experience and knowledge as a seafaring man whether or not there is any effect on the temperature occasioned by the presence of ice fields and icebergs?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I have had quite a lot of experience in field ice and to the best of my knowledge I do not think the temperature indicates anything. I do not think that is anything to go by.

Senator FLETCHER.

You made no observations?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I have made observations, years ago; but on the Titanic the sixth officer or the fifth officer had to note all those observations, and that is why I did not know the temperatures recorded.

Senator FLETCHER.

You did not know the temperature of the air or of the water that night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I happened to remark that it was rather cold, and somebody said, “It is 31”; but I do not know what time it was. I think it was during my watch from 4 to 6 Sunday evening.

Senator FLETCHER.

Could you tell whether the temperature had been falling?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; you could tell that.

Senator FLETCHER.

Since about what time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I had only gone on deck at 4 o’clock. I went on deck at 4 Sunday afternoon and was on deck until 6, and I knew it was colder than it was at noon, when I left the bridge.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you get by wireless the positions of the icebergs that you mentioned?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

And you plotted them, you say, on the chart?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

Were you careful as to the locations in placing them on the chart?

Mr. BOXHALL.

With regard to the French steamer’s positions, they were of no use to us, because he was considerably north of the track.

I put them on the chart; but I remarked to the captain, “This fellow has been to the north of the track the whole way.” So they were of no use to us; but they were on the chart, just the same.

Senator FLETCHER.

As to the other positions, did anyone help you in plotting them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I showed them to the captain and I had the wireless telegram alongside of me and saw that they were quite correct.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did anyone check you up or verify your calculations or assist you in seeing that they were correct?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They may have done so; I do not know.

Senator FLETCHER.

What was the course of the Amerika?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say whether she was eastbound or westbound. The Touraine, I think, was eastbound.

Senator FLETCHER.

Could you say whether the Amerika was taking practically the same track as the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I could not say that, either.

Senator FLETCHER.

Do you know whether she usually did?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I think those ships keep the track.

Senator FLETCHER.

The Amerika, then, was on the same track that the Titanic was on, practically?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That depends on whether she was eastbound or westbound.

Senator FLETCHER.

Assuming she was eastbound, would she be on the same track?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; she would be to the southward of us.

Senator FLETCHER.

How much?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know what distance she would be south of us in that position. Just about the corner. Probably 40 or 50 miles. You could take it off the chart.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did she locate the bergs near her?

Mr. BOXHALL.

She located the bergs that she had seen as far as I know. Someone else may have reported them to her.

Senator FLETCHER.

If she had seen bergs she must have seen them south of your track?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is, if she was eastbound.

Senator FLETCHER.

Yes; if she was eastbound.

Mr. BOXHALL.

But these bergs I did not put down in positions that were south of the track, or else I should have made a special note to the captain about them. If I had seen any on the track or the southward of the track I should have done that.

Senator FLETCHER.

I understood you to say that you saw a steamer almost ahead of you, or saw a light that night, about the time of the collision?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Shortly afterwards; yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you describe that light? What was the character of the light you saw; and did you see more than one?

Mr. BOXHALL.

At first I saw two masthead lights of a steamer, just slightly opened, and later she got closer to us, until, eventually, I could see her side lights with my naked eye.

Senator FLETCHER.

Was she approaching you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Evidently she was, because I was stopped.

Senator FLETCHER.

And how far away was she?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I considered she was about 5 miles away.

Senator FLETCHER.

In which direction?

Mr. BOXHALL.

She was headed toward us, meeting us.

Senator FLETCHER.

Was she a little toward your port bow?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just about half a point off our port bow.

Senator FLETCHER.

And apparently coming toward you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator FLETCHER.

And how soon after the collision?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I can not say about that. It was shortly after the order was given to clear the boats.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you continue to see that steamer?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw that light, saw all the lights of course, before I got into my boat, and just before I got into the boat she seemed as if she had turned around. I saw just one single bright light then, which I took to be her stern light.

Senator FLETCHER.

She apparently turned around within 5 miles of you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

Had the rockets then gone off on the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir. I had been firing off rockets before I saw her side lights. I fired off the rockets and then she got so close I could see her side lights and starboard light.

Senator FLETCHER.

What was the character of the rockets fired off on the Titanic, as to colors?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Just white stars, bright. I do not know whether they were stars or bright balls. I think they were balls. They were the regulation distress signals.

Senator FLETCHER.

Not red?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, no; not red.

Senator FLETCHER.

Can you say whether any rockets fired at night by a ship under those conditions form a distress signal, or whether rockets may be sent up that are not distress signals?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Some companies have private night signals.

Senator FLETCHER.

What are they?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They are colored as a rule; stars, which you can see. These rockets were not throwing stars, they were throwing balls, I remember, and then they burst.

Senator FLETCHER.

It seems that an officer on the Californian reported to the commander of the Californian that he had seen signals; but he said they were not distress signals. Do you know whether or not under the regulations in vogue, and according to the custom at sea, rockets fired, such as the Titanic sent up, would be regarded as anything but distress signals?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I am hardly in a position to state that, because it is the first time I have seen distress rockets sent off, and I could not very well judge what they would be like, standing as I was, underneath them, firing them myself. I do not know what they would look like in the distance.

Senator FLETCHER.

Have you ever seen any rockets sent off such as you say are private signals?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

Under what circumstances?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Ships passing in the night, signaling to one another.

Senator FLETCHER.

Were those rockets carried on the Titanic for the purpose of being used as distress signals?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; exclusively.

Senator FLETCHER.

They were not carried or supposed to be used for any other than distress signals?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; no, sir. We did not have any time to use any of those things.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you see any other rockets from any other ships that night?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I did. I saw rockets on the Carpathia.

Senator FLETCHER.

That was in the morning?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; it was in the morning. It was quite dark.

Senator FLETCHER.

About what time was that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know. I think it was a little after 4 o’clock, sometime, when I got on board the Carpathia. It might have been three-quarters of an hour before.

Senator FLETCHER.

What sort of a rocket was that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

An ordinary rocket. I think it was, so far as I could see, a distress rocket in answer to ours.

Senator FLETCHER.

What kind of steamer was that which you saw, that apparently turned around, as to size and character?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is hard to state, but the lights were on masts which were fairly close together – the masthead lights.

Senator FLETCHER.

What would that indicate?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That the masts were pretty close together. She might have been a four-mast ship or might have been a three-mast ship, but she certainly was not a two mast ship.

Senator FLETCHER.

Could you form any idea as to her size?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I could not.

Senator FLETCHER.

You know it was a steamer and not a sailing vessel?

Mr. BOXHALL

Oh, yes; she was a steamer, carrying steaming lights – white lights.

Senator FLETCHER.

She could not have been a fishing vessel?

Mr. BOXHALL

No, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

Was she a sailing vessel?

Mr. BOXHALL

No, sir; a sailing vessel does not show steaming lights, or white lights.

Senator FLETCHER.

I understood you to say all the lifeboats but one had been lowered when the one you were in was lowered . Was that correct?

Mr. BOXHALL

There was one boat hanging on the davits on the port side when I left.

Senator FLETCHER.

Was that a collapsible boat?

Mr. BOXHALL

No, sir; it was a lifeboat; No. 4 lifeboat.

Senator FLETCHER.

Had the collapsible boats all been lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL

There was no collapsible boat touched on the port side when I left. They could not lower them until the boat I was in got away and left our falls clear.

Senator FLETCHER.

Then the collapsible boats were all lowered after the boat in which you left was lowered?

Mr. BOXHALL

Yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you say how many went in that boat you were in?

Mr. BOXHALL

Approximately, I should judge there were between 25 and 30; 25 or 30, as nearly as I can tell.

Senator FLETCHER.

That was one of the boats that had a capacity of 60 or 65?

Mr. BOXHALL

No, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

It was not?

Mr. BOXHALL

No, sir; she was one of the smaller boats. She was an emergency boat.

Senator FLETCHER.

What they call a sea boat or sun boat?

Mr. BOXHALL

Yes, sir; a sea boat.

Senator FLETCHER.

Could you tell anything about the suction when you were half a mile away?

Mr. BOXHALL

No; but I did find there was a little suction just as I was pulling around the ship. I was lowered on the port side, and pulled around to the starboard side shortly afterwards, and I found there was suction then; that the ship was settling down broadside.

Senator FLETCHER.

Were you convinced, when you took to the boat in which you left, that the Titanic would go down?

Mr. BOXHALL

I was quite undecided about it.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you say you talked with Mr. Ismay on the bridge about three quarters of an hour before the Titanic sank?

Mr. BOXHALL

I talked to Mr. Ismay a little while before I left the ship. I do not know whether it was three quarters of an hour or not before the ship sank.

Senator FLETCHER.

Where was it?

Mr. BOXHALL

I had just fired a distress signal and was going to the chart room to put the lanyard back in the chart room and go out again, and Mr. Ismay was standing by the wheelhouse door.

Senator FLETCHER.

You had not begun to prepare for lowering the boats?

Mr. BOXHALL

Oh, yes; some of the boats had gone.

Senator FLETCHER.

Some of the boats had gone?

Mr. BOXHALL

Yes.

Senator FLETCHER.

What was Mr. Ismay doing there?

Mr. BOXHALL

He just came to the door on the bridge, as nearly as I can tell; walked up as far as the door. He was not there when I went to the lanyard; at least not when I went to fire the distress signal a moment before.

Senator FLETCHER.

That was on the boat deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On the boat deck, yes, sir; on the bridge.

Senator FLETCHER.

What did he say to you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He asked me why I was not getting the boat away.

Senator FLETCHER.

What did you reply to that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I told him I had no orders to get the boat away. I said the crew were ready and people were getting in the boat.

Senator FLETCHER.

What did you do then?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I went on with my work.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you proceed then to get the boat away, and get them ready?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; the chief officer got that boat ready, and it was just ready to lower when the captain told me to get in her; that is, they had just started to lower when the captain told me to get in her.

Senator FLETCHER.

The captain told you what?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I think they were either just starting to lower or I had heard them sing out, “Lower away” when the captain told me to get in the boat. I did not load it. The chief officer loaded it and superintended the lowering.

Senator FLETCHER.

You did not assist in loading any of the boats?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was there some little time before that; I can not say what boat it was that I was assisting in clearing away, and I can not say what boats they were, but they were on the port side.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you assist in lowering the boat in which you went away, that the chief officer told you to get into?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir. He did not tell me to get into that boat.

Senator FLETCHER.

Capt. Smith did?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Capt. Smith did.

Senator FLETCHER.

Where was he at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He was standing up on the boat deck, just by the bridge.

Senator FLETCHER.

Where?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Alongside of the fiddley; alongside the officers’ house.

Senator FLETCHER.

And not far from boat No.4?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Right abreast of No. 2 boat.

Senator FLETCHER.

No. 2 boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

Was Mr. Ismay there, too?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not notice Mr. Ismay there.

Senator FLETCHER.

Had not the captain previously given the command to get the boats away before Mr. Ismay told you about that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He may have done so, but I did not hear it.

Senator FLETCHER.

How many of the crew went in that boat in which you left?

Mr. BOXHALL.

One steward, one cook, a sailor, and myself.

Senator FLETCHER.

The captain wanted you to go in order to have some one in charge of the boat, to be sure that some one could use the oars? Was that the idea?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Probably.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did he ask for anybody who could row to get in the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Did the captain ask?

Senator FLETCHER.

Yes.

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I did not hear him.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you see the captain after that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; not after I was lowered away.

Senator FLETCHER.

Did you see Mr. Ismay after that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not until he came up alongside of the Carpathia; when his boat pulled up alongside, I was passing people out of one of the other boats. That is the first time I saw him afterwards.

Senator FLETCHER.

Mr. Ismay was in the collapsible boat, was he not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

Do you know which one?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know, sir. There was no collapsible boat away from the ship when I left, unless the one on the starboard side had gone away. I can not remember whether she had gone away or not. There was none on the port side.

Senator FLETCHER.

After you got in the water did you see the light from this steamer that you had seen previously?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I saw it for a little while and then lost it. When I pulled around the ship I could not see it any more, and did not see it any more.

Senator FLETCHER.

Apparently that ship came within 4 or 5 miles of the Titanic, and then turned and went away in what direction, westward or southward?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know whether it was southwestward. I should say it was westerly.

Senator FLETCHER.

In westerly direction; almost in the direction which she had come?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator FLETCHER.

That is all.

Senator SMITH.

Mr. Boxhall, you saw this ship with the light?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And you took the rockets and fired them, to signal to it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

We have been figuring the distance the Californian was away from the Titanic, and from the positions given we have concluded – that is, we have evidence to support the theory – that the Californian was but 14 miles distant from the Titanic. Do you think that under those circumstances you could have seen the Californian?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know, sir. I should not think so.

Senator SMITH.

You should not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No. Five miles is the distance the British Board of Trade requires masthead lights to show – that is, the white steaming lights of the steamer – but we know that they can be seen farther on such a clear night as that.

Senator SMITH.

Suppose the Californian, 14 miles away, had been firing rockets for you and you had been on the bridge or on the boat deck, do you think you could have seen the rockets?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not at 14 miles; I should not think so.

Senator SMITH.

You have had 13 years experience?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

In navigation?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You have spent 12 months in a training school?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

At the risk of invading a field with which neither one of us may be familiar, I want to ask you about the watertight compartments of the Titanic. Are you familiar with them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir. I did not go down in the watertight compartments of the Titanic, or view the electrical appliances down below.

Senator SMITH.

Were you familiar with the watertight compartments above?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Have you been in them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I have walked through them, sir.

Senator SMITH.

On which deck or decks were they located?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They were located on pretty nearly every deck, I should think, from what I remember. I can not say the highest deck where there were watertight compartments. I did not take particular notice of that.

Senator SMITH.

Can you tell to what decks the watertight bulkheads extended?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There were watertight doors on E deck; I know that.

Senator SMITH.

On A deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

On E deck.

Senator SMITH.

Assuming that the watertight bulkheads extended to the upper or E deck, were there hatches on E deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There were watertight doors on D deck.

Senator SMITH.

Were they fitted with watertight covers or doors?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The door, sir, is simply an iron door with clamps on it on both sides.

Senator SMITH.

That could not be sealed?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; you can seal that door from either side. The clamps work right through the door.

Senator SMITH.

I am talking about the hatches. Are you talking about the hatches?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No sir; I am talking about the doors.

Senator SMITH.

Were the hatches on E deck fitted with watertight covers?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; but not to keep out a rush of water like this. They would only keep out the –

Senator SMITH. (interposing)

Deck water?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The deck water that would wash over the deck.

Senator SMITH.

They were not intended to resist the sea?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not water with a pressure; they were not intended to resist that. They were not intended to resist pressure from underneath.

Senator SMITH.

They were fitted with coamings, in the language of the sea?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And not with a watertight cover?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, there is a watertight cover just to prevent the sea-going down. There are wooden hatches on the top instead of the coamings; wooden hatches laid across the beams, and after the hatches are put on the watertight covers are spread over.

Senator SMITH.

Then you said you went down in the mail room?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

And saw the water coming in?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, I did not see water coming in. I said I could hear the water coming in.

Senator SMITH.

Where did you explain you saw the water coming in the mail room?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was standing in the sorting room, and the water was just then within two feet of this deck I was standing on. I could see it through the opening in the staircase which led down to the lower place.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know whether there was any way of sealing the hatch to the mail room to keep the water from coming into E deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, I do not know, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You did not see anything of that kind?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You have heard some witnesses testify that there was water on E deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; I have not heard that, sir.

Senator SMITH.

This Englishman who was on the stand first this afternoon said there was water on A deck.

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; but he left the ship after I did, according to his evidence.

Senator SMITH.

You heard no testimony, then, that the water was on E deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You left before there was water on E deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There may have been water on E deck before I left.

Senator SMITH.

But you did not see it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You do not know how it got there?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I know how it would get there. It would come up through this hole that was probably underneath the mail room.

Senator SMITH.

Come up through the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

To E deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

These watertight compartments are watertight at the bottom?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They are watertight as far as they extend, sir.

Senator SMITH.

They are watertight at the sides?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Are they watertight at the ceiling?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

If they had been watertight at the ceiling, would the Titanic still be afloat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not in that particular case, because there were evidently three or four of the watertight compartments ripped up. They were all damaged or else the ship would not have gone down.

Senator SMITH.

There seems to be a great deal of confusion about the watertight compartments, and I have innumerable letters and telegrams asking that these compartments be searched by the Navy Department. The only watertight compartments that I have ever seen were on the Baltic, and I was shown about the watertight compartments by the late captain of the Titanic, about six years ago, so that I have not very much knowledge about them except from what I saw then. But to be watertight the ceiling should be able to resist the water as well as any other part of the watertight compartment, should it not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; it should; but if the ship is going to float after she has been damaged the water in that one compartment will not rise any higher than the level of the sea, so there is no strain on the ceiling, or there is probably no strain on the ceiling

Senator SMITH.

I think you have given the information I was seeking. The reason why the upper part of the watertight compartment is not so constructed as to resist the water is because some means of ingress and egress must be left or provided?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is so.

Senator SMITH.

In the case of the watertight compartments on the Titanic there were staircases?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Leading out of these watertight compartments?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Suppose the passengers with no lifeboats and no lights in sight were confronted with the alternative of leaping into the open sea or inclosing themselves in these compartments to die there, is there any means by which they could get into these compartments themselves?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; probably if they went down to the cabin they might get into one of these compartments.

Senator BOURNE.

Are you familiar with the boiler room?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

Are you familiar with the coal bunkers beside the boilers, between the boilers and the skin of the ship?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; I was not down there in that ship.

Senator BOURNE.

You have no knowledge appertaining to that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

None at all.

Senator NEWLANDS.

How about the ice in the locality in which you placed it on the chart? Was it likely to drift; and if so, in what particular direction?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; we should expect it to drift to the northward and to the eastward.

Senator NEWLANDS.

And not toward the south?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not to the southward, as a rule; not in the Gulf Stream.

Senator NEWLANDS.

So that, as you proceeded along the track after you had charted this ice, your assumption would be that the ice would drift farther away from your track rather than drift toward it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

More to the northward and eastward; yes, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

Mr. Boxhall, you are a practical navigator, as I understand?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

Would it be feasible and desirable to have a map in the chart room, and to note each day the information that you might acquire by wireless from other ships as to their location? Would that be an advantage in any way in navigation?

Mr. BOXHALL.

We do that.

Senator BOURNE.

That is noted on the map, as it is?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; on the chart in the officers’ chart room and on the chart in the captain’s chart room.

Senator BOURNE.

You keep your record then, both of your own position and the position of other ships with which you have been in communication by wireless?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

How often are those records put down?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Do you mean do we put down on the chart the positions of the ships from which we receive messages?

Senator BOURNE.

Yes.

Mr. BOXHALL.

No; we do not put their position on the chart. If they report derelicts, or wreckage, or anything like that, we plot those positions on the chart.

Senator BOURNE.

Would it not bring about a better correlation between you and other ships in that vicinity if you noted on the chart the relative positions, in conjunction with your own, at the time you noted your own position?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They do not always give their positions.

Senator BOURNE.

They do not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

Would it be any benefit to navigation if they were required do so?

Mr. BOXHALL.

A few of them give their positions. It is very handy.

Senator BOURNE.

It perfectly practical, is it?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, yes; certainly.

Senator BOURNE.

And might be, and in your judgment would be, a benefit to navigation if required?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Mr. Boxhall, you seem to be the one upon whom we must rely to give the difference between ship’s time and New York time; or, rather, to give ship’s time and give the New York time when this accident occurred.

Mr. BOXHALL.

At 11.46 p.m., ship’s time, it was 10.13 Washington time, or New York time.

Senator SMITH.

And that was the time of the impact?

Mr. BOXHALL.

There is a question about that. Some say 11.45, some say 11.43. I myself did not note it exactly, but that is as near as I can tell I reckoned it was about 11.45.

(Witness Excused.)

Testimony of Joseph G. Boxhall, recalled

(Testimony taken separately before Senator Burton on Monday, April 29, 1912.)

Senator BURTON.

I understand you have testified before the full committee about the radiograms relating to ice?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir. I have stated upstairs, or in Senator Smith’s presence, this afternoon that I did not hear of any ice reports the day of the accident.

Senator BURTON.

None were reported to you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did not hear any. There were none reported to me. I do not think any were reported during my watch on deck, or I should have heard it.

Senator BURTON.

When was your watch on deck?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I was on deck on Sunday morning from 8 o’clock until noon, and I was on again from 4 until 6, and then I was on again from 8 until the time of the accident.

Senator BURTON.

You made an entry on the chart as to ice of which you had received information, did you not?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator BURTON.

When was that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I can not get the day, but it was probably a couple of days before, when we had a radiogram from the captain of La Touraine, giving his position at 7 o’clock Greenwich time, and I worked out our position at 7 o’clock Greenwich time and wrote out the time for Capt. Smith.

Senator BURTON.

You made an entry of that on the chart?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; and showed the captain the position the captain of La Touraine had given us.

Senator BURTON.

Do you recall what that position was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; but I recall this much, as I remarked to Capt. Smith, that those positions were of no use to us because they were absolutely north of our track. You will understand these French boats do not keep the recognized tracks we do. French boats are always to be found to the northward. Therefore I plotted all these positions out. He had given us the position of a derelict, or something, and when I plotted this derelict and these various icebergs he had seen I could almost form an opinion of this track he had taken, and I said, “They are out of our way.”

Senator BURTON.

About how far north of your track?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say; but considerably north. He had gone right across the Banks.

Senator BURTON.

Twenty or thirty miles?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I would not like to say any distance. He had gone across the Banks, and we did not get on the Banks, at all.

Senator BURTON.

You did not check that up with any special care after you had put that location down, because you thought it out of your course?

Mr. BOXHALL.

It was put down just as carefully as I should have put it down if it had been on our course. I did not know exactly where she was until I saw the actual position on the chart. The captain saw me, and he was there alongside of me where I was putting the positions down, or shortly after I put them down, anyhow, he read the telegram and looked at it, and these positions satisfied him.

Senator BURTON.

Did you receive any messages that informed you of ice in your track?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not to my knowledge.

Senator BURTON.

Not when you were on watch?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir; and I do not think there were any received at all of ice on our track, or the word would have been passed around right away; everybody would have known it. As soon as these messages are received, where, there is ice one of the junior officers of the watch plots the positions on the chart.

Senator BURTON.

What is the custom as to making observations? Does the same person take the observations who also makes the computations as to where you are?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Sometimes. It just depends on the state of the weather, and it depends a lot on the captain. Some captains will not allow their senior officers to go inside of the chart room and work these observations out, leaving the junior officer on the bridge. Others do.

Senator BURTON.

What was the case on the Titanic?

Mr. BOXHALL.

In this case I think it was optional; of course, with a fair amount of regard for the weather. Sometimes the officers went inside, and sometimes they did not.

Senator BURTON.

The captain of the Mount Temple maintains that the course as conveyed by the distress signal was wrong; that the Titanic was actually eight miles distant from the place indicated. What do you say as to that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know what to say. I know our position, because I worked the position out, and I know that it is correct. One of the first things that Capt. Rostron said after I met him was “What a splendid position that was you gave us.”

Senator BURTON.

You gave them what position?

Mr. BOXHALL.

41º 46′, and 50º 14′.

Senator BURTON.

And you are satisfied that was correct?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Perfectly.

Senator BURTON.

You computed it yourself, did you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I computed it myself, and computed it by star observations that had been taken by Mr. Lightoller that same evening; and they were beautiful observations.

Senator BURTON.

Who made the computations on them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I did. You asked me if the officer who took the observations and the one who made the computations compared their results?

Senator BURTON.

Yes.

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not see what there is to compare. The officer who takes the observations always is the senior officer.

Senator BURTON.

He writes those down, does he?

Mr. BOXHALL.

He simply takes the observations with his sextant. The junior officer takes the time with the chronometer, and then is told to work them out.

Senator BURTON.

That is, another person works them out?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes. If he does not think these things are correct, he tells you to work them over, and you have to do it.

Senator BURTON.

Would there not be some danger of your mistaking a figure, or something of that kind, that is written down by another person?

Mr. BOXHALL.

When you take stars you always endeavor, as they did that night, to take a set of stars. One position checks another. You take two stars for latitude, and two for longitude, one star north and one star south, one star east and one star west. If you find a big difference between eastern and western stars, you know there is a mistake somewhere. If there is a difference between these two latitude stars you know there is a mistake somewhere. But, as it happened, I think I worked out three stars for latitude and I think I worked out three stars for longitude.

Senator BURTON.

And they all agreed?

Mr. BOXHALL.

They all agreed.

Senator BURTON.

What time did you do that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I really do not know what time it was. I was working these things out after 8 o’clock, and Mr. Lightoller took them before 8 o’clock.

Senator BURTON.

About how long was that before the collision?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The collision was at 11.43, I think.

Senator BURTON.

And how long before the collision did you make this computation?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I suppose about 10 o’clock. Yes; I finished before 10 o’clock, because I gave Mr. Lightoller the results when I finished.

Senator BURTON.

And the result as to the position of the ship was arrived at by computing your speed after 10 clock to the time of the collision?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator BURTON.

You are very sure it was right, and Capt. Rostron said it was?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Capt. Rostron said it was a very, very good position. After I had worked these observations of Mr. Lightoller’s I was taking star bearings for compass error for myself, and was working those out. That is what kept me in the chart room most of the time. I was making computations most of the time.

Senator BURTON.

Did you yourself receive these messages relating to ice?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I received those I copied.

Senator BURTON.

What did Murdoch mean by the expression “I intended to port around it?” What is the meaning of that expression?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is easier described than explained. (Mr. Boxhall explained on a diagram the meaning of the term referred to.)

Senator BURTON.

How near was the wireless station to the bridge?

Mr. BOXHALL.

The wireless station was in the after part of the officers’ quarters, between the second and third funnels.

Senator BURTON.

And to whom did you give the longitude and latitude?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I took it down on a piece of paper, and the wireless operator had the receivers on his ears. It is the usual thing, whenever I go into a Marconi office, and the operators are busy listening, not to interrupt them. Whatever I have to say I write down.

Senator BURTON.

You wrote it down and handed it to him?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator BURTON.

And he sent it immediately, did he?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I judge so.

Senator BURTON.

How much did the Titanic draw at that time?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could not say what the draft was when we left Southampton; probably 33 feet.

Senator BURTON.

You are very positive you saw that ship ahead on the port bow, are you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir, quite positive.

Senator BURTON.

Did you see the green or red light?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes; I saw the side lights with my naked eye.

Senator BURTON.

When did you see them?

Mr. BOXHALL.

From our ship, before I left the ship. I saw this steamer’s stern light before I went into my boat, which indicated that the ship had turned around. I saw a white light, and I could not see any of the masthead lights that I had seen previously and I took it for a stern light.

Senator BURTON.

Which light did you see first?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw the masthead lights first, the two steaming lights; and then, as she drew up closer, I saw her side lights through my glasses, and eventually I saw the red light. I had seen the green, but I saw the red most of the time. I saw the red light with my naked eye.

Senator BURTON.

Did she pull away from you?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know when she turned; I can not say when I missed the lights, because I was leaving the bridge to go and fire off some more of those distress rockets and attend to other duties.

Senator BURTON.

Then your idea is that she was coming toward you on the port side?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator BURTON.

Because you saw the red light and the masthead lights?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir.

Senator BURTON.

Afterward you saw the green light, which showed that she had turned?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I think I saw the green light before I saw the red light, as a matter of fact. But the ship was meeting us. I am covering the whole thing by saying the ship was meeting us.

Senator BURTON.

Your impression is she turned away, or turned on a different course?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is my impression.

Senator BURTON.

At a later time, when you were in the boat after it had been lowered, what light did you see?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw this single light, which I took to be her stern light, just before I went away in the boat, as near as I can say.

Senator BURTON.

How long did you see this stern light?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw it until I pulled around the ship’s stern. I had laid off a little while on the port side, on which side I was lowered, and then I afterwards pulled around the ship’s stern, and, of course, then I lost the light, and I never saw it anymore.

Senator BURTON.

Her course, as she came on, would have been nearer to your course; that is, your course was ahead, there, and she was coming in toward your course?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes, sir; she was slightly crossing it, evidently. I suppose she was turning around slowly.

Senator BURTON.

Is it your idea that she turned away?

Mr. BOXHALL.

That is my idea, sir.

Senator BURTON.

She kept on a general course toward the east, and then bore away from you, or what?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not think she was doing much steaming. I do not think the ship was steaming very much, because after I first saw the masthead lights she must have been still steaming, but by the time I saw her red light with my naked eye she was not steaming very much. So she had probably gotten into the ice, and turned around.

Senator BURTON.

What do you think happened after she turned around? Do you think she went away to avoid the ice?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I do not know whether she stayed there all night, or what she did. I lost the light. I did not see her after we pulled around to the starboard side of the Titanic.

Senator BURTON.

Then you lost track of her?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Yes.

Senator BURTON.

And you saw her no more after that?

Mr. BOXHALL.

No, sir. As a matter of fact, Capt. Smith was standing by my side, and we both came to the conclusion that she was close enough to be signaled by the Morse lamp. So I signaled to her. I called her up, and got no answer. The captain said, “Tell him to come at once, we are sinking.” So I sent that signal out, “Come at once, we are sinking.”

Senator BURTON.

And you kept firing up those rockets?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Then leaving off and firing rockets. There were a lot of stewards and men standing around the bridge and around the boat deck. Of course, there were quite a lot of them quite interested in this ship, looking from the bridge, and some said she had shown a light in reply, but I never saw it. I even got the quartermaster who was working around with me – I do not know who he was – to fire off the distress signal, and I got him to also signal with the Morse lamp – that is just a series of dots with short intervals of light – whilst I watched with a pair of glasses to see whether this man did answer, as some people said he had replied.

Senator BURTON.

You saw nothing of the hull of the boat?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Oh, no; it was too dark. I have already stated, in answer to a question, how far this ship was away from us, that I thought she was about 5 miles, and I arrived at it in this way. The masthead lights of a steamer are required by the board of trade regulations to show for 5 miles, and the signals are required to show for 2 miles.

Senator BURTON.

You could see that distance on such a night as this?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I could see quite clearly.

Senator BURTON.

You are very sure you are not deceived about seeing these lights?

Mr. BOXHALL.

Not at all.

Senator BURTON.

You saw not only the mast light but the side lights?

Mr. BOXHALL.

I saw the side lights. Whatever ship she was had beautiful lights. I think we could see her lights more than the regulation distance, but I do not think we could see them 14 miles.

(Witness Excused.)

 

Testimony of Norman C. Chambers

(Testimony taken separately before Senator William Alden Smith, chairman of the subcommittee.)

(The witness was sworn by Senator Smith.)

Senator SMITH.

Please state your full name and residence.

Mr. CHAMBERS.

Norman Campbell Chambers, 111 Broadway, New York.

Senator SMITH.

What is your business?

Mr. CHAMBERS.

Mechanical Engineer.

Senator SMITH.

You were on board the Titanic on this ill-fated voyage?

Mr. CHAMBERS.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

I wish you would tell the committee what you know about the collision, and any circumstances leading up to or subsequent to the impact, which may tend to throw light upon this unfortunate affair.

First, did you, after the impact, observe the condition of the watertight compartments?

Mr. CHAMBERS.

Our stateroom was E-8, on the starboard side; that is the lowest berth deck, and as far as I know, we were as far forward as any of the first-cabin passengers on that deck.

At the time of the collision I was in bed, and I noticed no very great shock, the loudest noise by far being that of jangling chains whipping along the side of the ship. This passed so quickly that I assumed something had gone wrong with the engines on the starboard side.

Senator SMITH.

What did you do then?

Mr. CHAMBERS.

At the request of my wife I prepared to investigate what had happened, leaving her dressing. I threw on sufficient clothes, including my overcoat. I went up, in a leisurely manner, as far as the A deck on the starboard side. There I noted only an unusual coldness of the air. Looking over the side I was unable to see anything in any direction.

I returned below, where I was joined by my wife, and we came up again to investigate, still finding nothing. However, there was then a noticeable list to starboard, with probably a few degrees of pitch; and as the ship had a list to port nearly all afternoon, I decided to remain up, in spite of a feeling of perfect safety.

Upon returning to the stateroom for the purpose of completing dressing, I looked at the starboard end of our passage, where there was the companion leading to the quarters of the mail clerks and farther on to the baggage room and, I believe, the mail-sorting room, at the top of these stairs I found a couple of mail clerks wet to their knees, who had just come up from below, bringing their registered mail bags. As the door in the bulkhead in the next deck was open, I was able to look directly into the trunk room, which was then filled with water, and was within 18 inches or 2 feet of the deck above.

We were standing there joking about our baggage being completely soaked and about the correspondence which was seen floating about on the top of the water. I personally felt no sense of danger, as this water was forward of the bulkhead.

While we were standing there three of the ship’s officers – I did not notice their rank or department – descended the first companion and looked into the baggage room, coming back up immediately, saying that we were not making any more water. This was not an announcement, but merely a remark passed from one to the other. Then my wife and myself returned in the direction of our stateroom, a matter of a few yards away only, and as we were going down our own alleyway to the stateroom door our steward came by and told us that we could go back to bed again; that there was no danger. In this I agreed with him, personally.

However, I finished dressing, my wife being already fully and warmly clothed, and she in the meanwhile having gone out into the passage to note any later developments, came rushing back to me, saying that she had seen another passenger who informed her that the call had been given out for lifebelts and on the boat deck. I went out, myself, and found my room steward passing down the alleyway, and had the order verified.

As I was at the time fully dressed and wore my heavy overcoat, in the pockets of which I had already placed certain necessities, we started up. My wife had presence of mind enough to take a lifebelt. I opened my steamer trunk and took out a small pocket compass, and, sending my wife on ahead, opened my bag and removed my automatic pistol.

We then proceeded immediately upward, my wife being rather alarmed, as she had also been at the time of the collision. But for her I should have remained in bed, reading.

We kept on upward, passing, at the various landings, people who did not appear to be particularly frightened, until we arrived on the A deck, going out on the port side, where I shortly found the deck steward; joked with him about opening his little office room, and obtained our two steamer rugs.

We then proceeded up the port outside companion onto the boat deck. There did not at any time seem to be any particular group of passengers around the boats on the port side, although there were seamen there unlimbering the gear.

Owing to the list being to the starboard, I assumed that the boats which were lowered on the starboard side would be sure to clear the ship, while those on the port side might have some difficulty. This was only an assumption, as I have not heard of any such difficulty since.

We the proceeded over the raised deck caused by the unusual height of the ceiling in the lounge, and came down again onto the boat deck proper on the starboard side. Then I gave my wife a drink from my flask, filled my pipe, put on my lifebelt at her urgent request, she having hers already on, and we stood at the rail for a few moments.

I would like to call particular attention to the fact that from the moment the engines were stopped steam was of course blown out from the boilers. This, coming through one single steam pipe on the starboard side of the forward funnel, made a terrific loud noise; so loud, indeed, that persons on the boat deck could only communicate by getting as close as possible and speaking loudly, As a matter of fact, I shouted in my wife’s ear.

All this time I considered that the lifeboats were merely a precaution and, upon my wife’s suggestion, we moved up forward of the entry from the deck house.

There were still quite a number of passengers coming out, the stewards standing there directing them to the boats aft.

Instead of going aft, we stepped behind the projection of this entry, which was of the vestibule type and waited until people had apparently ceased coming and the steward was no longer there. Then we started forward again, and, as nearly as I can remember, stopped at the last one of the forward starboard group of lifeboats. This was already swung out level with the deck, and to my eyes, appeared sufficiently loaded.

However, my wife said that she was going in that boat, and proceeded to jump in, calling me to come. As I knew she would get out again had I not come, I finally jumped into the boat, although I did not consider it, from the looks of things, safe to put very many more people in that boat.

As I remember it, there were two more men, both called by their wives, who jumped in after I did. One of them – a German, I believe – told me, as I recollect it, later on the Carpathia that he had looked around and had seen no one else and no one to ask whether he should go in or not, and he jumped in.

Senator SMITH.

How many people were in the boat at that time?

Mr. CHAMBERS.

That I cannot tell.

By the time we were settled and I began to take note of the things on the ship I noticed a tall young officer clad in a long overcoat, which may help identify him, giving orders to another officer to go into our boat and take charge of the boats on our side. As a parting injunction he gave our officer (whom I later found to be a Mr. Pitman) instructions to hold onto his painter and pull up alongside the gangway after the boat had reached the water.

Preliminary to this, and before lowering, all of which was done with absolute calm, I heard someone in authority say, “That is enough before lowering. We can get more in after she is in the water.”

I remember these conversations particularly, as at the time I was wondering at the source of the order, being morally certain, myself that no doors in the ship’s side had been opened.

We were then lowered away in a manner which I would consider very satisfactory, taking into account the apparent absolute lack of training of the rank and file of the crew.

Shortly before we reached the water our officer called and finally blew his whistle for them to stop lowering, that he might find out if the plug was in or not. The inquiry was called in a loud tone of voice, to which one of the crew in our boat replied that it was, that he himself had put it in. Meanwhile a voice from above called down, as nearly as I can recollect it, “It is your own blooming business to see that the plug is in, anyhow.”

When we reached the water, we then had difficulty in casting off the falls. The little quartermaster had to crawl between our legs to the amidship portion of the boat in order to reach what was apparently called the “trigger,” which is, I believe, a mechanism used to release both falls simultaneously.

We then put out our oars and crawled away slowly from the ship until we lay some three or four hundred yards off.

Senator SMITH.

Did you observe anything unusual regarding the watertight compartments?

Mr. CHAMBERS.

I was rather surprised at the time when she struck to hear no particular orders or signals for closing the watertight doors. By those I mean such as are usually closed by the stewards, and were, when I last traveled on the Cunarders, a number of years ago, always tested by being closed by the stewards themselves at noon or thereabouts.

Senator SMITH.

At noon of each day?

Mr. CHAMBERS.

At noon each day, yes; when the whistle blew at noon. That was on the old Etruria and Umbria. I never traveled on the Campania and Lucania.

While I did not make a careful examination of the mechanism of the doors, I, at the same time, had looked them over rather more than casually, on my way to and from the swimming pool in mornings.

I remember being somewhat surprised that these doors were not nowadays operated by electricity, this being only a landsman’s point of view. As a matter of fact, they were operated from the deck above, the E deck, by first removing a small boiler plate which fitted flush with the deck and was unscrewed by means of the two forked end of a pin spanner; that apparently giving access to the square or hexagon end of a shaft which, being rotated by another box wrench some 2 feet 6 inches in length, with a T handle, operated a double series of bevel gears, the last shaft having on it a pinion meshing in a door rack and closing the door.

The cover plates to the mechanism of the watertight doors, as far as I am able to state, were not removed before our final departure for the upper decks.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any attempt being made to remove them?

Mr. CHAMBERS.

I did not. I saw no attempt being made to remove them.

Senator SMITH.

What else can you tell about that matter that will be helpful to the committee?

Mr. CHAMBERS.

I have no reason to believe that any attempt was made by the stewards, on whom I have always understood this duty devolved, to close these doors, particularly as a large percentage of the steward part of the crew were new. Seeing these door plates undisturbed just before our final departure to the upper decks, I reached the conclusion that the doors had not been closed.

In connection with my statement that a large percentage of the steward part of the crew were new, I may say that my own room steward complained to me on the second day out that he did not know where anything was on the ship, and that no one would tell him.

(Witness Excused.)

 

Testimony of Herbert J. Haddock and E. J. Moore, cont.

Icebergs and field ice in 42.3 north. 49.9 west, 41.34 north, 50.09 west. He tells us he is 200 miles out of his course.

5.45 p. m., Received following from the Carpathia:

Private to Capt. Haddock. Olympic

Captain, chief, first, and sixth officers, and all engineers gone. Also doctor, all pursers, one Marconi operator, and chief steward gone. We have second, third, fourth, and fifth officers and one Marconi operator on board.

At the same time, sir, the following:

Carpathia

CAPTAIN Olympic:

Will send names immediately we can. You can understand we are working under considerable difficulty. Everything possible being done for comfort of survivors. Please maintain stand-by.

ROSTRON

5.45 p. m. Carpathia then starts sending names of survivors, He says: “Please excuse sending, but am half asleep.”

7.35 p. m. Received 322 first and second class passengers names from him. During the transmission of the names it was evident that the operator on Carpathia was tired out.

7.40 p. m. Sent five private messages to the Carpathia. He says the third class passengers’ names and list of crew will follow later.

7.50 p. m. Trying to read Cape Race, who has a bunch of traffic for us. His signals very weak and am interfered with by atmospherics. We tried for some time, but his signals so weak impossible to read them.

8.35 p. m. Sent one private message to Californian asking if they had any survivors on board from the Titanic.

8.45 p. m. Private message from the Californian saying no Titanic survivors on board. Standing by for the Carpathia and calling him frequently. Hear nothing from him, I informed the commander that I was unable to hear anything more of Carpathia and asked, “Should I start sending list of names to Cape Race.?” He instructed me to send them. 10 p. m., on the 15th. Calling Cape Race with list of survivors, but can not hear him.

Q. The message that Rostron sent to the Associated Press I would like to have in full. – A. The time is 8.25 p.m. on Monday, the 15th.

Q. This message was relayed through the Olympic from the Carpathia, and is as follows:

Carpathia. Cunard New York and Liverpool:

Titanic struck iceberg Monday. 3 a. m., 41.16 north,. 50.14 west. Carpathia picked up many passengers in boats. Will wire further particulars later. Proceeding back to New York.

ROSTRON.

Q. Was this sent to the Cunard office or to the Associated Press? – A. It was sent to the Cunard and the Associated Press.

Q. Does your memorandum show when you transmitted this message? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. Just indicate, will you, please? – A. I sent them after I sent the list of survivors to Cape Race (quoting from report):

2.30 a. m., Completed sending list of survivors names through to Cape Race and then start sending Carpathia’s service messages, after which received the following from him –

Q. Did you send this message from Capt. Rostron only after you received the list of survivors? – A. Not until after I sent the list of survivors.

Q. Then you sent this message to Capt. Rostron immediately after sending the list of survivors, which is about 2.30 a. m. of Tuesday, the 16th? – Yes.

Q. Did you have say trouble reaching Cape Race then? – A. No, sir.

Q. That message you turned over to Cape Race Coast Station without any difficulty? – A. Yes; I presume there were five altogether and I sent the whole five there.

Q. Do you know the reason why it was not received at the White Star office until the 16th? – A. No, sir.

Q. (To Mr. Moore, wireless operator.) Did you relay a message from Mr. Ismay to Mr. Franklin, New York? – A. No, sir.

Q. That was not relayed through the Olympic? – A. No, sir.

Q. (To Capt. Haddock.) Are there any messages there, Captain, that bear upon this matter? – A. These bear on the Titanic disaster.

Q. Have you got a copy of them? – A. I think I can spare a copy of it.

Q. Now, Captain, I would like to ask you when you received the first information about the sinking of the Titanic you got this information from the Titanic direct, that indicated the serious condition she was in, and you went to her relief? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. On Sunday night or Monday morning you had a message from them? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. That impressed you with its seriousness, of course? – A. Yes.

Q. At what time and at what hour did you receive your first information, whether official or unofficial, regarding the sinking? – A. I just read it out to you, sir.

Q. Was that from the Carpathia? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. You had no information from any other source than that you have referred to of the ship being sunk? – A. No, sir; none whatever.

Q. The Virginian did not advise you of any information you were not in possession of? – A. No, sir.

Q. I want to get particularly to this point. The Virginian communicated with Cape Race and Cape Race communicated with Montreal and Montreal communicated with Mr. Franklin over the telephone at 2.30 Monday morning? – A. (By Mr. Franklin.) I called them up about 2.30 and they replied at about 3.30. I told them of the rumor already heard from the Associated Press, and they advised me – about 3.30 – that they had the same rumor in Montreal.

Q. You were in position, were you not, to communicate with the Californian early Monday morning? – A. I will have to allow Mr. Moore to answer that.

(Mr. E. J. MOORE, being duly sworn, gave the following answers on examination by Senator Smith:)

Q. What is your name? – A. Ernest James Moore.

Q. Your residence? – A. Topsham, Devonshire, England.

Q. Your business? – A. Wireless operator for the Marconi Co. on the steamship Olympic.

Q. 4.52 p. m. on Monday the 15th – was that the first message from the Californian that told of the disaster? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. And of the sinking of the ship? – A. It does not mention that, sir; it only says: “Saw quantity of wreckage.”

Q. After that message was received, was the coast station at Cape Race or Cable Sable communicated with giving that information? – A. No, sir.

Q. Were you at any time instructed by anyone not to give that information? – A. No, sir.

Q. (To Capt. Haddock.) Were you, Captain, at any time directed not to give any information concerning it? – A. None whatever.

Q. And your failure to give information in your possession was due to what? – A. To my desire for accuracy in such cases as that, sir.

Q. (To Operator Moore.) The Ismay message, I believe, to Islefrank, New York, which was handed to the Carpathia operator, sent after the rescue, telling Mr. Franklin what had occurred, was not sent through the Olympic? – A. No, sir; not through us.

Q. Did you receive a message from the Carpathia –

ISLEFRANK, New York:

Deeply regret advise you Titanic sank this morning after collision iceberg resulting serious loss life. Further particulars later.

BRUCE ISMAY.

A. No such message received by me, sir.

Q. You offered to take any messages from the Carpathia and communicate promptly with Cape Race? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. At that time you were then eastward of the Carpathia? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did the Carpathia operator make any effort to use your offer to transmit his messages via Cape Race? – A. No, sir.

Q. What messages did you receive from the White Star Line or Mr. Franklin from New York? – A. First message received 5,20 a. m. Monday the 15th from New York –

Capt. HADDOCK, Olympic:

Endeavor communicate Titanic and ascertain time and position, reply as soon as possible to Ismay, New York.

F. W. REDWAY.

7.35 a. m. on the same day:

NEW YORK.

COMMANDER Olympic:

Keep us posted full regarding Titanic.

FRANKLIN.

7.45 a. m.:

To ISMAY, New York:

Since midnight when her position was 41.46 north 50.14 west have been unable to communicate, we are now 310 miles from her, 9 a. m., under full power, will inform you at once if hear anything.

COMMANDER.

Q. Did you get that message from Sable Island? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. I want to call your attention to a message at 1.40 p. m. on Monday, reading as follows:

CAPE RACE AND NEW YORK.

WIRELESS OPERATOR, Olympic:

We will pay you liberally for story of rescue of Titanic passengers.

Q. Was anything done about that? – A. No, sir.

Q. You rendered no special service to the World, and received no compensation? – A. No, sir; I have received seven or eight messages to the same effect.

Q. Can you give the names of the papers? – New York Herald, the Sun, and the World.

Q. Evidently you did not answer all of them. – A. I did not send to any of them. I just made a note of that message just to show what we were receiving from time to time.

Q. Then this message was sent, New York time, Monday, the 15th – right after 1.40? – A. Yes, sir. I then informed the operator that it was no use sending me messages from newspapers asking us to send news of the Titanic, as we had no news to give.

Q. (To Capt. Haddock.) Captain, I know you have something to do and I want to hurry with you. Did you receive my information from the officers of your company, either in Liverpool or New York, requesting you not to give out information? – A. Absolutely, no.

Q. And your failure to give information when you first received it, you say, was due to your desire to make it more accurate? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. The message that you sent a little after 4 seems to be the message that was delivered to Franklin at 6.16? – A. Yes, sir.

Q. You had no suggestion from Mr. Ismay that information be withheld? – A. None whatever.

Q. And you wish to be understood as saying that no information was withheld? – A. None whatever, sir.

Q. Do you know how it happened that the Baltic did not make use of the information they had? – A. I did not know she had any, sir; I had not heard anything of the Baltic.

Q. The testimony of the operator was that they wished this information from the Carpathia and Californian early Monday morning. She was in touch with Cape Race, but she was going east and did not give the information out, I wondered whether there was any concerted action among the steamers. – A. She was out of touch of us, sir.

Q. And you stood ready to transmit any information from the Californian or Carpathia or any other ship to the coast station regarding this accident and if it was not transmitted as promptly as it should have been it was not due to your fault, but to the fault of those who failed to give you the information? – A. Yes, sir; I do not think that anybody failed to give us the information. The Carpathia had at that time a terrible job on her hands.

Q. The captain of the Carpathia wired me from Gibraltar that he gave specific instructions to relay messages from Mr. Ismay and other messages immediately through other vessels, and the fact that this message to Mr. Ismay was not relayed caused us some anxiety. We could not understand it. – A. Might I ask what time this was, sir?

Q. Mr. Ismay sent this message two hours after daylight on Monday morning as he got aboard the Carpathia, and it was delivered to Mr. Franklin on Wednesday the 17th. Do you know anything about that, Mr. Moore? – A. None whatever.

Q. When did they begin relaying messages from the Carpathia? – A. This message was handed in early on Monday morning and no doubt was sent out on Monday morning early and they did not have to relay it.

Q. (To Mr. Moore.) Did you receive any injunction from the Marconi people or anyone else to withhold information? – A. None whatever.

Q. You received no consideration for withholding it? – A. No; and none was offered to us.

Q. Tell me whether it has been your practice to accept anything for information which comes to you as a wireless operator? – A. No; I have never received anything from anyone.

Q. Would you consider it proper to receive anything? – A. No, sir; I should not.

Q. Can you tell us anything that will tend to throw any light upon the matter we are inquiring into that you have not been asked? – A. I do not think so, sir; my report covers the whole thing as far as we are concerned.

(Witnesses Excused.)

 

Testimony of Charles E. Stengel

Senator SMITH.

What is your full name?

Mr. STENGEL.

C. E. Henry Stengel.

Senator SMITH.

Where do you reside?

Mr. STENGEL.

Newark, N. J.

Senator SMITH.

What is your business?

Mr. STENGEL.

Leather manufacturer.

Senator SMITH.

Were you a passenger on board the Titanic on the ill-fated voyage from Southampton to the place of the accident?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

While you were on that voyage did you familiarize yourself with the speed of the Titanic?

Mr. STENGEL.

I did, the last day; particularly the last day, I did.

Senator SMITH.

Particularly the day of the accident?

Mr. STENGEL.

The day of the accident; that is, from Saturday noon to Sunday noon.

Senator SMITH.

Will you kindly tell the committee how you familiarized yourself with the speed, and what the speed was when you last informed yourself about it?

Mr. STENGEL.

As is usual in these voyages, there were pools made to bet on the speed that the boat would make, and at 12 o’clock, after the whistle blew, the people who had bet went to the smoking room, and came out and reported she had made 546 knots. I figured then that at 24 hours to a day we made 22 3/4 knots; but I was told I was mistaken; that I should have figured 25 hours.

Senator SMITH.

Twenty-five hours for the day?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, on account of the elapsed time, I believe, which made it almost 22 knots an hour. At the same time a report came – this was the report that came from the engine room – that the engines were turning three revolutions faster than at any time on the voyage.

Senator SMITH.

What time was that on Sunday?

Mr. STENGEL.

I should say about between 1 and 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon.

Senator SMITH.

Did you have occasion to consult with anyone as to, or did you familiarize yourself with, the speed of the ship after that time?

Mr. STENGEL.

Not after that time, any more than I called my wife’s attention to the fact that the engines were running very fast. That was when I retired, about 10 o’clock. I could hear the engines running when I retired, and I noticed that the engines were running fast. I said I noticed that they were running faster than at any other time during the trip.

Senator SMITH.

How could you tell that?

Mr. STENGEL.

Just through being familiar with engines in the manufacturing business. We have bought a great many engines in 28 or 29 years, and we generally take the speed of the engine. We want to buy an engine that will run a certain speed to do a certain amount of work. It was just natural instinct that was all.

Senator SMITH.

Where were you when the accident happened?

Mr. STENGEL.

I had retired. My wife called me. I was moaning in my sleep. My wife called me, and says, “Wake up; you are dreaming;” and I was dreaming, and as I woke up I heard a slight crash. I paid no attention to it until I heard the engines stop. When the engines stopped I said, “There is something serious; there is something wrong. We had better go up on deck.” I just put on what clothes I could grab, and my wife put on her kimono, and we went up to the top deck and walked around there. There were not many people around there. That was where the lifeboats were. We came down to the next deck, and the captain came up. I supposed he had come up from investigating the damage. He had a very serious and a very grave face. I then said to my wife, “This is a very serious matter, I believe.” I think Mr. Widener and his wife – I think it was Mr. Widener – followed the captain up the stairs, and they returned, and I presume they went to their staterooms. Shortly after that the orders were given to have the passengers all put on life preservers. I went back to my stateroom and put a life preserver on my wife, and then she tied mine on. We went back up to the top deck. Then I heard the orders given to put all the women and children in the boats and have them go off about 200 yards from the vessel.

Senator SMITH.

Who gave that order?

Mr. STENGEL.

It seemed to me an officer. Of course I was a little bit agitated, and I heard them and I did not look particularly to see who it was. While they were loading the lifeboats, the officers or men who had charge of loading the lifeboats said, “There is no danger; this is simply a matter of precaution.” After my wife was put in a lifeboat she wanted me to come with them, and they said, “No; nothing but ladies and children.” After the five boats, I think it was, or the boats as far as I could see on the starboard side, were loaded, I turned toward the bow. I do not know what led me there, but there was a small boat that they called an emergency boat, in which there were three people, Sir Duff Gordon and his wife and Miss Francatelli. I asked the officer – I could not see them, it was so dark, and I presume I was agitated somewhat – I asked him if I could not get into that boat. There was no one else around, not a person I could see except the people working at the boats, and he said, “Jump in.” The railing was rather high – it was an emergency boat and was always swung over toward the water – I jumped onto the railing and rolled into it. The officer then said, “That is the funniest sight I have seen tonight,” and he laughed quite heartily. That rather gave me some encouragement. I thought perhaps it was not so dangerous as I imagined. After getting down part of the way there was a painter on the boat, and we were beginning to tip, and somebody hollered to stop lowering. Somebody cut that line and we went on down.

Senator SMITH.

Describe this rail if you can. Was it a guard?

Mr. STENGEL.

I do not know what they call it; a fence, like, on the side. The other lifeboats were all loaded from the floor. You could step right from the floor into the lifeboats.

Senator SMITH.

That was on the upper deck?

Mr. STENGEL.

That was on the boat deck; yes, sir; toward the bow.

Senator SMITH.

And this rail was at the outside of the boat deck?

Mr. STENGEL.

It was just at the edge of the deck, just to keep people from falling over.

Senator SMITH.

How high was it?

Mr. STENGEL.

I should judge it was about three feet and a half, or so.

Senator SMITH.

Was there any opening in it?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Persons entering that boat were obliged to go over that rail?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Did your wife go over that rail?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir; my wife was loaded three or four boats previous to that. We were up there quite early; that is, we were up there almost the first on the deck.

Senator SMITH.

When you got down to the water, what happened?

Mr. STENGEL.

Just as I jumped into the boat some one else, a man named A. L. Solomon [Saloman], appeared. I do not know where he appeared from, but he asked to get in and jumped in the boat with us. There were five passengers and, I understand, three stokers and two seamen; that is, five of the crew.

Senator SMITH.

How many women?

Mr. STENGEL.

There were two ladies – Sir Duff Gordon’s wife and Miss Francatelli – in that boat. There was no one else in sight at that time.

Senator SMITH.

And there were no other occupants of that boat?

Mr. STENGEL.

Not of the passengers. At that time, when they were getting ready to lower, then I jumped in, and Mr. Solomon did also.

Senator SMITH.

You had five passengers. Does that include you and Mr. Solomon?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

You had three stokers?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Three seamen and two women?

Mr. STENGEL.

No; three stokers and two seamen.

Senator SMITH.

Two seamen and two women?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir.

Senator SMITH.

That is, 12 people all told?

Mr. STENGEL.

No; 10 all together.

Senator SMITH.

Your five passengers included the two women?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; the five passengers included the two women.

Senator SMITH.

Did any others of the passengers or crew board that boat?

Mr. STENGEL.

Besides the 10 that I say were on it?

Senator SMITH.

Yes.

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Who was in charge of that boat?

Mr. STENGEL.

I do not know. As I said, there were two seamen, one at the bow and one at the rudder at the stern, and the other three were rowing, with myself, as I was rowing with one of the stokers.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know who gave directions?

Mr. STENGEL.

I think between Sir Duff Gordon and myself we decided which way to go. We followed a light that was to the bow of the boat, which looked like in the winter, in the dead of winter, when the windows are frosted with a light coming through them. It was in a haze. Most of the boats rowed toward that light, and after the green lights began to burn I suggested it was better to turn around and go toward the green lights, because I presumed there was an officer of the ship in that boat, and he evidently knew his business.

Senator SMITH.

That was evidently from another lifeboat?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; it was from another lifeboat.

Senator SMITH.

Did you go toward it?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; we did.

Senator SMITH.

Did you reach its side?

Mr. STENGEL.

We did not reach its side. It was toward morning that we turned, and by that time another man and myself thought we saw rockets – one rocket; that is, a rocket explode – and I said, “I think I saw a rocket,” and another one said, “I think I saw a rocket,” and one of the stokers, I think it was, said, “I see two lights. I believe that is a vessel.” Then, after that, when another green light was burned, there was a flash light from a boat, and I said, “Now, I am pretty positive that is a boat, because that is an answer to the green signal,” and one of the stokers said, “The green light is the company’s color,” I understood him to say. That is what he said. Whether he was right or not, I do not know. When we saw that flashlight, it was like powder was set off. I said, “Now, let us give it to her and let us steer in between the green light – where we saw the green light – and that boat,” and that being a very light boat we left the other boats quite a way behind. I felt somewhat enthused to see the boat, and I began to jolly them along to pull. I said, “Keep pulling.” We kept pulling, and I thought we were the first boat aboard; but I found that the boat that had the green lights burning was ahead of us. We were the second boat aboard.

Senator SMITH.

What was the number of this emergency boat?

Mr. STENGEL.

I do not know, sir; I did not look at that.

Senator SMITH.

How far out from the side of the upper deck did that boat hang when you got into it?

Mr. STENGEL.

It was right up against the side. If it had not been I would have gone down into the water, because I rolled. I did not step into it; I just simply rolled.

Senator SMITH.

There was no difficulty in entering it when you got over this rail?

Mr. STENGEL.

No. There was a partition of canvas or something or other like that to keep it from scraping the sides.

Senator SMITH.

Did you see icebergs the next morning?

Mr. STENGEL.

I guess you could. They were all around. You could see them. As soon as we landed down into the water, as soon as we were afloat, you could see icebergs all around, because we thought they were sailing vessels at first, and began pulling this way, and then turning around and going the other way. They were in sight all along the horizon.

Senator SMITH.

Were you menaced in any way, after you got into the water in this emergency boat, by ice?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

How far away was it from you, apparently?

Mr. STENGEL.

It was quite a ways, but you could see the outline in the dusk.

Senator SMITH.

Describe these icebergs. How large were they?

Mr. STENGEL.

There was one of them, particularly, that I noticed, a very large one, which looked something like the Rock of Gibraltar; it was high at one point, and another point came up at the other end, about the same shape as the rock of Gibraltar.

Senator SMITH.

How did it compare with size of the Titanic?

Mr. STENGEL.

I was a good ways off. It was not quite as large as the Titanic but it was an enormous, large iceberg.

Senator SMITH.

Can you approximate its height from the water?

Mr. STENGEL.

Of course I might. At such a distance I should judge it was 250 feet high at the highest point.

Senator SMITH.

Where was the field ice – back of these icebergs or to the east of them?

Mr. STENGEL.

The field ice I did not see much of until we got aboard the Carpathia. Then there was a floe there that I should think was about 5 miles long, and I should say it would take 20 minutes by the Carpathia to get by that field ice. It was ice all covered with snow.

Senator SMITH.

How high above the water?

Mr. STENGEL.

Not very high above the water.

Senator SMITH.

Five or ten feet, or something like that?

Mr. STENGEL.

I should judge not over 2 feet; 2 or 3 feet.

Senator SMITH.

Do you think of anything more you care to say in addition to what you have already said that might throw any light on the subject of this inquiry?

Mr. STENGEL.

No. There is only one thing that I would like to say and that is that evidently, when they struck the iceberg, the ice came on the deck, and there was one of the passengers had a handful of ice when we were up there, and showed it. Another passenger said that the ice came into his porthole. His porthole was open.

Senator SMITH.

How long after the impact was it before the engines were stopped?

Mr. STENGEL.

A very few minutes.

Senator SMITH.

Give the number of minutes, if you can. You are accustomed to machinery and matters of this kind.

Mr. STENGEL.

I should say two or three minutes, and then they started again just slightly; just started to move again. I do not know why; whether they were backing off, or not. I do not know. I hardly thought they were backing off, because there was not much vibration of the ship.

Senator SMITH.

Did you hear or see anyone arousing passengers from their rooms after the impact?

Mr. STENGEL.

I heard the order given to the stewards to arouse the passengers, and afterwards I heard somebody remark, ” Did you ever see such actions,” or some remark like that – “Did you ever see such actions as the stewards are showing.” It seems they were not arousing the people.

Senator BURTON.

They were not, do you say?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir. There was a remark made like that, “Did you ever see such actions of the stewards,” or some remark like that, indicating they were not doing their duty.

Senator SMITH.

What is your judgment about it?

Mr. STENGEL.

My judgment about the officers is that when they were loading I think they were cool. I think so far as the loading of the boats after the accident was concerned, sir, they showed very good judgment. I think they were very cool. They calmed the passengers by making them believe it was not a serious accident. In fact, most of them, after they got on board the Carpathia, said they expected to go back the next day and get aboard the Titanic again. I heard that explained afterwards by an officer of the ship, when he said, “Suppose we had reported the damage that was done to that vessel; there would not be one of you aboard. The stewards would have come up” – not the stewards, but the stokers – “would have come up and taken every boat, and no one would have had a chance of getting aboard of those boats.”

Senator SMITH.

Did you see any man attempt to enter these lifeboats who was forbidden to do so?

Mr. STENGEL.

I saw two, a certain physician in New York and his brother, jump into the same boat my wife was in. Then the officer or the man that was loading the boat, said “I will stop that. I will go down and get my gun.” He left the deck momentarily and came right back again. Afterwards I heard about five shots; that is while we were afloat. Four of them I can account for in this way, that when the green lights were lit on the boat they were lashed to my wife’s boat – the man shot off a revolver four times, thinking it was a vessel. The man in charge said, “You had better save all your revolver shots, you had better save all your matches, and save everything. It may be the means of saving your life.” After that I heard another shot that seemed to be aboard the Titanic. It was explained to me afterwards that that was the time that one of the men shot off his revolver – that is, the mate or whoever had charge of the boat shot off his revolver – to show the men that his revolver was loaded and he would do what he said; that any man who would step into the lifeboat he would shoot.

Senator SMITH.

But you saw no attempt by a man to enter a lifeboat, except in the manner you have described?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir; I saw no attempt of anyone to get into the lifeboats except those two gentlemen that jumped in the boat after the boat was lowered; that is, started to lower.

Senator SMITH.

With reference to communication with shore or ship wireless stations after you got aboard the Carpathia, is there anything you can say about that; whether there was any notice published or any directions given as to the manner in which the wireless stations aboard the Carpathia should be operated?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; there was on the bulletin board one telegram which said that they would like to have information of the Titanic, and “Ask the captain to send it via the Navy,” or they gave the name of the land station – to telegraph it that way; to get permission from the captain to send it that way.

There was another quite large bulletin posted by the captain which said there had been rumors aboard brought to him that the press was using the wires, and the captain made it very emphatic, and said, “I wish to state emphatically that there have not been but 20 words sent to the press,” and that the wires were at the service of the survivors of the Titanic.

Senator SMITH.

And was this wire signed by the captain or the operator?

Mr. STENGEL.

That was signed by, I think, the purser.

Senator SMITH.

What day was that, considering the time you got aboard the Carpathia? Was it Monday, or Tuesday, or Wednesday?

Mr. STENGEL.

I think it was Tuesday, sir. I am not sure, sir, but I am under the impression it was Tuesday.

Senator SMITH.

Did you make any attempt to communicate with your friends or home?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; I did; and through the efforts I made to help the people aboard the boat there, they said,” We appreciate what you are doing, and your two messages have gone.”

Senator SMITH.

What time was that?

Mr. STENGEL.

I think the first message was sent on Sunday, just stating, “Both aboard the Carpathia; both safe aboard the Carpathia.”

Senator SMITH.

That was Sunday night?

Mr. STENGEL.

I think it was Sunday – no; I mean Monday, sir. I mean Monday.

Senator SMITH.

What time Monday?

Mr. STENGEL.

I should judge in the morning, some time.

Senator SMITH.

To whom was it addressed?

Mr. STENGEL.

It was addressed to the firm of Stengel and Rothschild, Newark, N.J.

Senator SMITH.

Was that message received?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; that message was received.

Senator SMITH.

When?

Mr. STENGEL.

That I do not recollect. I could not give that definitely, but I sent another message after that, asking to have two automobiles to meet me at the Carpathia pier; that I expected to bring some survivors home with me. I expected to bring several ladies, one from Fond du Lac, and one from Green Bay, and one from North Dakota, and another lady from West Orange; but as we left the boat they all found their friends, and I had no use for the two machines after that.

Senator SMITH.

Can you inform the committee, either now or later, when the message to your firm was delivered on Monday, if it was delivered on Monday?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes; I could get that information.

Senator SMITH.

We would like to have that information.

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; I will. There was a message sent to me which I never received. There was a message sent aboard the Carpathia which I never received, but which was answered by someone else, and it was signed –

Senator SMITH. (interposing)

Answered from the Carpathia by someone else?

Mr. STENGEL.

I do not know where it was answered from, but the answer came back to the message from the firm, and they asked whether I received the message, and I said no. They said it was answered.

Senator SMITH.

In your name?

Mr. STENGEL.

It evidently was. I did not see the message.

Senator SMITH.

If possible, I would like to have you look that up.

Mr. STENGEL.

All right, sir. I would say this, Senator, that my partner afterwards called up the Western Union about that, and they said that that message had not been delivered, and that there was a return fee for that message.

Senator SMITH.

That is, the message which was sent you which had not been delivered?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; the message sent to me.

Senator SMITH.

On what deck were your rooms?

Mr. STENGEL.

On C deck, 116.

Senator SMITH.

On what deck was this ice?

Mr. STENGEL.

That I could not tell you, any more than that I was told they got it off the deck. They did not state which deck it was taken off of.

Senator SMITH.

Do you care to say anything else?

Mr. STENGEL.

Nothing that I know of, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

The emergency boat that you got into had a capacity for how many passengers?

Mr. STENGEL.

I do not think it had a capacity for any more than were in it. It was just a small boat. In fact, when we arrived at the Carpathia it was never taken aboard the Carpathia. It was too small and too light a boat, and they just set it adrift. The other large lifeboats were taken aboard the Carpathia.

Senator BOURNE.

Were there any people left on deck when the boat you were in was lowered?

Mr. STENGEL.

I could not see a person. I think possibly that was because the last lifeboat was being lowered off the starboard side, and I suppose the people had gone to the other side.

Senator BOURNE.

Your boat was on the starboard side?

Mr. STENGEL.

On the starboard side, the right side looking toward the bow.

Senator BOURNE.

Your boat was the last boat to leave?

Mr. STENGEL.

So far as I saw. I saw no other boat on that side, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

When you were refused admission into the boat in which you wife was, were there a number of ladies and children there at that time?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir; there were not. These two gentlemen had put their wives in and were standing on the edge of the deck, and when they started lowering, they jumped in. My wife said there were five, but I saw only two.

Senator BOURNE.

What is your impression, that no effort was made to awaken the passengers who were asleep at the time of the accident?

Mr. STENGEL.

I would not say that, any more than I heard the comment made about the actions of the stewards. That is all I could say.

Senator BOURNE.

You have no specific knowledge in that direction?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

General orders were issued for the passengers to put on life preservers, were they?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; I heard those orders issued.

Senator BOURNE.

Do you know who issued the orders?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir; I do not. I heard the orders issued, and then I went down and put on a life preserver, and my wife put on one.

Senator BOURNE.

Were there any people on the decks, and did the number steadily increase after the issuance of these orders?

Mr. STENGEL.

They did not come up very fast; no, sir. There were not many people on deck when my wife’s boat went off, and I think my wife’s boat was about the second boat. There were not very many people on the top deck at that time.

Senator BOURNE.

When you had gone down and donned the life preservers and returned you returned to the top deck?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

So you are not cognizant of the condition on the lower decks?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator BOURNE.

That is all.

Senator BURTON.

Were there more than 10 in this emergency boat at any time before you were taken on board the Carpathia?

Mr. STENGEL.

Were there what?

Senator BURTON.

You have said there were 10; 5 passengers and 5 seamen?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir.

Senator BURTON.

Did any more come into that boat, and were they taken on before you were taken on board the Carpathia?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir. My wife told me the boat she was in had not quite enough people; that is, it was not loaded as much as the other boats, and they lashed two boats together and took some of the people out of one boat and put them in the other and divided them up.

Senator BURTON.

But in that boat there were not more than 10 at any time? That is, in your boat, I mean?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator BURTON.

And yet you say that was the capacity of the boat?

Mr. STENGEL.

So far as I could see; yes, sir.

Senator BURTON.

Did you compare that emergency boat with any of the other emergency boats to see if it was the same size?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir; I did not.

Senator BURTON.

You did not notice it before, while you were en voyage?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator BURTON.

Or later?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator BURTON.

Five hundred and forty-six knots was the run as posted just after Sunday noon, you say?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir.

Senator BURTON.

Referring to this light which you say appeared like a light showing through a frosted window pane, where was that light?

Mr. STENGEL.

It was right toward the bow; it was off in the distance.

Senator BURTON.

How far away was it?

Mr. STENGEL.

It was a good ways; I am not familiar with distances at sea, but it was quite a ways off, and most of the boats rowed that way. There was a lady had a cane, I believe, with an electric light, and she was flashing this light, and they were going to that boat, and we were going toward that boat, and there were two other boats around, so the two or three of us kept together; that is, all the boats besides our own kept together.

In one of those boats I think there was an old sailor, and he afterwards explained that he took the end of a rope and dipped it in oil and lit that. That was a flare light that every now and then would show.

Senator BURTON.

This light was not on any of the boats lowered from the Titanic?

Mr. STENGEL.

The light I spoke of, away off?

Senator BURTON.

Yes.

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator BURTON.

What was your conjecture about it?

Mr. STENGEL.

My conjecture was this, as I explained when I was first asked what it was. I thought it was a sort of northern light, reflecting on an iceberg. That was my impression of it.

Senator SMITH.

You did not think it was on a ship?

Mr. STENGEL.

Well, no. We all rowed for it at first, and then it vanished like.

Senator SMITH.

Where was it; ahead or on the port side?

Mr. STENGEL.

It was toward the bow. It was just as if, if you were going to walk off the bow of the ship, you would walk toward that light.

Senator SMITH.

Toward it?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

To the left or to the right?

Mr. STENGEL.

I think a little bit to the right, sir. I am not sure of it, but I should think a trifle to the right.

Senator FLETCHER.

How far were you from the Titanic when she went down?

Mr. STENGEL.

I could not say the distance. I saw all the movements. I saw her first row of port lights go under the water; I saw the next port lights go under the water; and finally the bow was all dark. When the last lights on the bow went under, I said, “There is danger here; we had better row away from here. This is a light boat, and there may be suction when the ship goes down. Let us pull away.” The other passengers agreed, and we pulled away from the Titanic, and after that we stopped rowing for awhile, and she was going down by the bow most all the time, and all of a sudden there were four sharp explosions about that far apart, just like this (the witness indicating by snapping his fingers four times), and then she dipped and the stern stood up in the air, and then the cries began for help. I should think that the people who were left on the boat began to jump over. There was an awful wail like.

Senator FLETCHER.

Could you see the people?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir; I could not see any of the people, but I could hear them.

Senator FLETCHER.

What was the character of these explosions?

Mr. STENGEL.

I do not know, but I should judge it would be a battery of boilers going.

Senator FLETCHER.

Might it have been bulkheads giving way?

Mr. STENGEL.

I do not know. I have never been familiar with bulkheads giving way; but they were quite hard explosions. She dipped, then, forward, and all you could see was the stern sticking up. When I heard the cries I turned my back. I said, “I can not look any longer.”

Senator FLETCHER.

You did not attempt to go back to get any of those people?

Mr. STENGEL.

We could not. We were quite a ways away, and the suggestion was not made, and we did not; that is all there is about that. I do not know why we did not, but we did not.

Senator SMITH.

Was there any evidence of intoxication among the officers or crew that night?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir. I have a distinct recollection of a Mrs. Thorne stating, while talking about the captain being to dinner, that she was in that party, and she said, “I was in that party, and the captain did not drink a drop.” He smoked two cigars, that was all, and left the dining room about 10 o’clock.

Senator SMITH.

You have spoken of this betting pool. Was any officer or member of the crew engaged in this pool, that you know of?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir; not that I know of. I just happened to be in the party. I had been watching a game of cards most of the trip, and Mr. Harris, one of the ill-fated passengers, had won the hat pool.

Senator SMITH.

This was a pastime among the passengers?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes.

Senator SMITH.

And you are quite certain that no officer or director took any part in it.

Mr. STENGEL.

I did not see any of them, sir; and I did not even go and look at the names of those who were on the list.

Senator SMITH.

You did not see Mr. Ismay there?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir; I do not know Mr. Ismay.

Senator SMITH.

Or the captain?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

There is Mr. Ismay, sitting back at the wall there (indicating).

Mr. STENGEL. (after looking at Mr. Ismay)

I do not think I saw Mr. Ismay but one evening, I think, while the band was playing after dinner.

Senator SMITH.

In the early part of the voyage?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes; in the early part of the voyage.

Senator SMITH.

You said that your friends got ice in a porthole; is that right?

Mr. STENGEL.

Not my friends. It was one of the passengers, who, when I first came up, had a handful of ice, and he said he got that off of the deck of the boat.

Senator SMITH.

Which deck?

Mr. STENGEL.

He did not say. He said, “I got this off of the deck of the boat;” and then another passenger afterwards, on the Carpathia, said that ice came in at his porthole.

Senator SMITH.

You do not know where that was?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir.

Senator SMITH.

Do you know where his stateroom was?

Mr. STENGEL.

No, sir; I do not.

Senator SMITH.

Was there comment because of the fact that the port hole was open; was there any special comment on that fact?

Mr. STENGEL.

He just wanted air. He said, “I left my port hole open for air.”

Senator SMITH.

And he got this ice?

Mr. STENGEL.

He got some of the ice in there.

Senator SMITH.

That is all. We are very much obliged to you, Mr. Stengel.

Mr. STENGEL.

You want the telegrams, you say; do you, sir?

Senator SMITH.

The telegram which you sent, and the telegram you received. Will you kindly send them to the committee?

Mr. STENGEL.

Yes, sir; thank you.

(Witness excused.)

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